May 18, 2022  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Human Services

  
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    HUSE 220 - Communication Skills in Helping Relationships

    3 CR
    This course teaches the psychology of interviewing, as well as the skills for conducting effective interviews. This involves the techniques for establishing rapport, developing counseling responses, identifying behavioral goals, and implementing strategies to bring about change or crisis intervention.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Assemble information appropriate for client documents including intake forms and case notes.
    2. Articulate why understanding professional ethics is essential for human service workers.
    3. Explain and integrate the various basic stages of the helping process.
    4. Demonstrate basic skills effectively when working with clients.
  
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    HUSE 225 - Culturally-Sensitive Practice

    3 CR
    This course will provide the student with the knowledge and strategies to work with the various lifestyles, needs, and problems of different racial and cultural groups. The content of the course incorporates important concepts and empirical findings that pertain to ethnic-sensitive practice.

    Additional Information: Recommend prior to or concurrent: HUSE 220 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and terms relevant to the culturally competent human service professional.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of what it means to be culturally competent.
    3. Identify concrete issues in working with culturally diverse clients.
    4. Distinguish relevant factors for treating culturally diverse clients.
  
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    HUSE 230 - Nutrition

    3 CR
    The course includes the study of essential nutrients and their functions as they relate to normal health, as well as the selection of food to meet the identified nutrient requirements.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Explain the functions of nutrient standards.
    2. Evaluate a 3-day diet journal for adequacy and excess.
    3. Identify the functions of basic nutrients and their interaction with the human body.
    4. Explain the relationships between diet, health, and disease.
    5. Identify the impact of the life cycle on nutritional requirements and the importance of lifestyle for present and future benefits.
    6. Interpret scientific guidelines and research related to nutrition, agriculture, food safety, and resource distribution.
    7. Examine the controversial issues surrounding nutrition information, the media, and advanced food and nutrient technology.
    8. Explain the impact of hunger on the individual, community, and the world.
  
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    HUSE 240 - Basic Concepts in Social Work

    3 CR
    This course introduces the student to the social work profession, its value base, and the code of ethics. There is an emphasis on methods and skills with an overview of social issues and client needs relative to social work practice.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Define the profession of Social Work.
    2. Articulate and explain the institution of social welfare.
    3. Discuss the values needed for social work practice.
    4. Demonstrate awareness of diverse populations and their relevance in the social work profession.
  
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    HUSE 250 - Introduction to Group Techniques

    3 CR
    This course introduces the student to the theoretical concepts and principles of group work methodology. There is an emphasis on basic practice skills and intervention techniques.

    Requisites: Take HUSE 101  with at least a grade of C-.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Recognize various group dynamics.
    2. Identify various types of groups.
    3. Explain the different stages of group intervention.
    4. Demonstrate the skills and techniques for group intervention.
  
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    HUSE 251 - Human Services and Behavior Modification

    3 CR
    This course introduces the student to the theory and application of behavior modification. The focus is on how the behavioral theory works with agencies and other organizations in the community.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of behavior modification.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of developing self-management programs.
    3. Analyze data collection.
  
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    HUSE 260 - Family Dynamics

    3 CR
    This course examines the family system as a basic social institution. Emphasis is placed on issues that are important to the individual and the family. The student will also be introduced to theoretical viewpoints and conceptual frameworks that have been proven useful in the intervention of marriage and family issues.

    Additional Information: Recommend prior to or concurrent: HUSE 220 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Explain the context of family systems.
    2. Analyze a family genogram.
    3. Demonstrate effective family intervention skills.
  
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    HUSE 270 - Selected Topics in Human Services

    3 CR
    This course will be offered to cover topics in response to the special interests of students. Topics may include family communication, programming, legal and ethical issues, cross-cultural practice, foster care, burn out, problem assessment, or sign language. Since topics change, students may take this course for up to six credit hours toward graduation.

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of concepts relevant to psychosocial problems with at-risk adolescents.
    2. Identify concrete issues in working with adolescents in various human service settings.
    3. Distinguish relevant factors for treating individuals and groups of culturally diverse at-risk adolescents.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of different prevention and treatment models for at-risk adolescents.
  
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    HUSE 272 - Substance Abuse, Co-Dependency, and the Family

    3 CR
    This course provides students an opportunity to understand the relationship between substance abuse, co-dependency, and the family. The focus is on the unique problems facing the families of substance abusers and how they attempt to cope.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .


    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of substance abuse, codependency, and family dynamics.
    2. Distinguish the characteristics of healthy families.
    3. Identify the characteristics of communication within codependent family systems.
    4. Identify and describe treatment and recovery processes.

     

  
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    HUSE 275 - Grant Writing

    3 CR
    This course will introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of grant writing and program evaluation. There is an emphasis on creating proposals for program funding.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Describe the process of developing a grant proposal.
    2. Identify various sources of funding.
    3. Describe the eight basic sections of a grant proposal.
    4. Develop an evaluation plan.
  
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    HUSE 280 - Death and Dying

    3 CR
    This is a psychosocial examination of death and dying in contemporary American society, although other societies at other time periods are considered. Medical, ethical, legal, and religious issues will be discussed. Instruction includes lectures, films, tapes, and a student position paper.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify attitudes toward death in modern, cosmopolitan societies.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of how public policy affects our dealings with dying and death.
    3. Identify issues and decisions related to the care of dying persons.
    4. Identify issues related to health care financing.
  
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    HUSE 290 - Social Welfare

    3 CR
    This course explores the social forces supporting the development of social welfare and social service policy. There is a focus on how people are affected by such problems as poverty, child abuse, alcoholism, crime, mental retardation, overpopulation, and emotional difficulties.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Discuss key social problems in the United States.
    2. Identify the helping institutions developed to evaluate and treat problems in the United States.
    3. Explain the role of social work in regards to treating social problems within our social welfare and social service organizations.

International Travel

  
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    INTL 210 - International Travel-Culture

    3 CR
    This course focuses on specific topics relevant to international culture. International travel is required. Since the specific topic to be studied may change from semester to semester, students may repeat the course for up to six credits.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze the political, social, historical, cultural, physical, economic, and/or geographical characteristics influencing a global region.
    2. Develop intercultural competence and a global perspective through a comparison of American and global cultures, values, beliefs, and attitudes.
    3. Analyze individual cultural viewpoints using a different frame of reference.
    4. Evaluate the role of the individual as a citizen of the world.

Information Security System

  
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    ISS 104 - Ethical Hacking Programming Techniques

    2 CR
    This course will provide students with advanced practical applications of programming to support offensive and defensive Cybersecurity operations. A crosscut of concepts, tools, and techniques will be utilized. Students will use interactive programming activities to create advanced tools to support common cybersecurity tasks. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take CP 103  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Construct, implement, and execute code to observe and detect passwords or access codes entered.
    2. Construct, implement, and execute code to observe and decode network traffic through various ports and interfaces.
    3. Construct, implement, and execute code to interact with commonly used internet/web application interfaces.
  
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    ISS 201 - Fundamentals of Securing Business and Industrial Devices

    3 CR
    In this course, students will learn the types of computer-based devices, systems, and networks used in modern business/industrial environments and the ways in which these elements can be compromised via cyber-attacks. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take CET 123  and CET 152  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Be able to identify vulnerabilities in cybersecurity defense within a device’s architecture.
    2. Be able to apply techniques to reinforce vulnerabilities identified within a device’s architecture.
    3. Be able to identify vulnerabilities in cybersecurity defense within device’s applications and operating system structure.
    4. Be able to apply techniques to reinforce vulnerabilities identified within the device’s application and operating system structure.
  
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    ISS 251 - Network/Server Perimeter Security and Monitoring

    3 CR
    This course covers internetworked systems security management and configuration. Topics include firewall, perimeter security, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), edge devices, assessment and monitoring of networks and servers. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take CET 250  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Student will be able to identify and assess current and anticipated security risks and vulnerabilities.
    2. Student will be able to develop a network security plan to protect from internal and external threats.
    3. Student will be able to filter web content, as well as create ACLs to filter traffic through the firewall.
    4. Student will be able to monitor, evaluate, test, report, and resolve security conditions and environment.
  
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    ISS 252 - Penetration Testing/Defensive Techniques

    3 CR
    In this course, students will learn skills such as ethical hacking/penetration testing, security testing, systems/network defense, and countermeasures. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take CET 250  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will be able to demonstrate the knowledge to perform penetration testing assessments and reports.
    2. Students will be able to recommend controls to implement the detection and respond to network breaches found in penetration testing assessments.
    3. Students will be able to assess potential operating systems vulnerabilities.
    4. Students will be able to use commonly applied tools and techniques to locate, repair, or mitigate security exploit.

Information Technology

  
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    IT 110 - Information Technology and Project Management

    3 CR
    This course provides an understanding of organizational information and technology used by various business subsystems. Information technology will be used in the demonstration of organization, planning, and project control. Students will gain practical knowledge in managing information project scope, schedule, and resources as a competitive resource. It also covers the technical and organizational foundations of information systems. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to perform as a contributing member of a team in project completion.
    2. Successfully perform the role of a team leader/project manager of a group project or assignment.
    3. Construct a work breakdown structure for a project.
    4. Construct a time management schedule for a project.
    5. Evaluate a project’s critical path.

Journalism

  
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    JOUR 111 - Mass Media Environment

    3 CR
    Students will explore the role of mass media in society and the fundamental aspects of careers associated with newspapers, magazines, radio, television, motion pictures, social media, entertainment, and public relations. Some story assignments will be published in The Bruin, the campus newspaper at Kellogg Community College.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Increase knowledge of mass media and the mass communication process.
    2. Expand awareness of how people participate in mass communication as consumers.
    3. Develop a basic understanding of mass communication techniques and media ethics.
    4. Enhance skills related to writing clearly, communicating efficiently, and summarizing information for a mass audience.
  
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    JOUR 112 - News Writing

    3 CR
    Students will study and practice the fundamental principles of gathering and writing news for online, newspaper, and broadcast media. The emphasis is on accurate observation, ethical reporting techniques, and the writing and editing of news for common understanding by mass audiences. Some story assignments will be published in The Bruin, the campus newspaper at Kellogg Community College. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take ENGL 151  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Communications
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Learn to accurately and ethically conduct research and report news.
    2. Develop a basic understanding of journalistic standards, media ethics, and media law.
    3. Enhance skills related to writing clearly, efficiently, and summarizing information for a mass audience.

Literature

  
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    LITE 105 - Introduction to Literature

    3 CR
    Studies in critical reading and appreciation of the major forms in fiction, poetry, and drama. Required course for English majors and minors.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Discuss readings and resources by creating reading analysis papers.
    2. Analyze a poem and/or short story; a novel and/or play in writing.
    3. Summarize literature resources in writing to share with the class.
    4. Demonstrate understanding of literature, assessed in quizzes and exams.
    5. Discuss and appreciate a variety of literary texts.
    6. Develop stronger analytical and critical readings skills.
    7. Write and communicate more effectively.
    8. Recognize and use a variety of literary themes, concepts, and interpretive strategies.
    9. Experience then human experience through various perspectives, voices, and eras on a local and global scale.
  
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    LITE 205 - World Literature 1

    3 CR
    A survey of world literature from the beginning of civilization to 1600.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate familiarity with the historical context in world literature.
    2. Practice close reading of various texts in world literature.
    3. Write a persuasive interpretation of a text with a clear controlling idea and well-chosen, well-organized evidence to support your argument.
    4. Support ideas and claims using specific textual support.
    5. Exhibit in written responses familiarity with literary analysis.
  
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    LITE 206 - World Literature 2

    3 CR
    A survey of world literature from literature from 1600 to present.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate familiarity with the historical context in world literature.
    2. Practice close reading of various texts in world literature.
    3. Write a persuasive interpretation of a text with a clear controlling idea and well-chosen, well-organized evidence to support your argument.
    4. Support ideas and claims using specific textual support.
    5. Exhibit in written responses familiarity with literary analysis.
  
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    LITE 211 - American Literature 1

    3 CR
    A survey of American literature to the early twentieth century.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate familiarity with the historical context in American literature.
    2. Practice close reading of various texts in American literature.
    3. Write a persuasive interpretation of a text with a clear controlling idea and well-chosen, well-organized evidence to support your argument.
    4. Support ideas and claims using specific textual support.
    5. Exhibit in written responses familiarity with literary analysis.
  
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    LITE 212 - American Literature 2

    3 CR
    A survey of American literature from the early twentieth century to the present.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate familiarity with the historical context in American literature.
    2. Practice close reading of various texts in American literature.
    3. Write a persuasive interpretation of a text with a clear controlling idea and well-chosen, well-organized evidence to support your argument.
    4. Support ideas and claims using specific textual support.
    5. Exhibit in written responses familiarity with literary analysis.
  
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    LITE 213 - Children’s Literature

    3 CR
    A general survey of the prose, poetry, and illustrated books suitable for the elementary grades. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Exhibit a clear understanding of the characteristics and genres of children’s literature.
    2. Exhibit a clear understanding of the audiences of children’s literature.
    3. Relate the ideas of a text to its broader cultural landscape.
    4. Demonstrate mastery of the tasks required to successfully analyze a literary text.
  
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    LITE 216 - Film Interpretation

    3 CR
    An introduction to film, including visual elements, meanings, and genre through the study of outstanding examples of historical and contemporary feature films. May include foreign films. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Recommend prior or concurrent: Take ENGL 152 .
    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate understanding of terminology and genre concepts related to film craft, including elements of design, cinematography, editing, and sound.
    2. Utilize critical analysis to critique and interpret films through writing and/or presentation.
    3. Apply knowledge of important technological and artistic advancements in the evolution of cinema.
  
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    LITE 223 - Shakespeare

    3 CR
    A study of selected Shakespearean plays designed to increase the reader’s appreciation and understanding of Shakespeare’s art.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of dramatic conventions in Shakespeare’s plays.
    2. Utilize critical analysis strategies to deconstruct and interpret specific passages, scenes, and sonnets.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of historical, political, cultural, and religious factors that helped shape Elizabethan life and drama.
    4. Explain why some scholars view Shakespeare’s body of work as the secular bible of the western world.
  
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    LITE 230 - Bible as Literature

    3 CR
    This course offers a critical study of the Hebrew Bible, the Apocrypha, and the Christian Bible as distinct but related literary and theological traditions.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate familiarity with historical, social, political, and cultural contexts affecting Biblical literature.
    2. Practice close reading of various texts in Biblical literature.
    3. Demonstrate competence in the tasks required to successfully analyze a literary text.
    4. Write a persuasive interpretation of a text with a clear controlling idea and well-chosen, well-organized evidence to support your argument.
  
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    LITE 240 - African American Literature

    3 CR
    A survey of African-American literature from 1600 to the present.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate familiarity with historical and social contexts affecting African American literature
    2. Practice and discuss the close reading of various texts in African American literature.
    3. Present on, or write a persuasive interpretation of a text with a clear controlling idea and well-chosen, well-organized evidence to support your argument.
    4. Support, in writing or in a presentation, ideas, and claims using specific textual support from the assigned readings.
    5. Exhibit, in classroom discussion, a presentation, and/or written responses, familiarity with literary terms.
  
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    LITE 241 - Science Fiction

    3 CR
    An exploration of the background major themes and types, authors, and influences of science fiction. The goal is to become acquainted with the inter-relationship between science fiction as an art form and the cultures from which it develops as a mode of perceiving and defining reality.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Develop an understanding of the nature of speculative fiction in general and science-fiction specifically.
    2. Acquire an understanding of the genre as presenting a critique, often ironic, of social conditions, trends, fads on a local and global scale.
    3. Explore the nature and limits of how reality is defined/perceived.
    4. Recognize the scope and range of science fiction literature.
    5. Explore the impact/influences of media on the science fiction genre.
  
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    LITE 285 - Studies in the Novel

    3 CR
    Studies in the relationship of literature and literary study to a second discipline: science, philosophy, psychology, social science, or fine arts. The literary genre and period and the second area vary from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit toward graduation up to six credit hours.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of fictional conventions in novels.
    2. Utilize critical analysis strategies to deconstruct and interpret specific passages within a larger work of fiction.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of fiction’s connection to at least one other discipline, genre, or topic: i.e. history, sociology, graphic arts, censorship, etc.
    4. Work collaboratively with classmates to synthesize material on a novel, author, and/or topic for the purpose of a group presentation.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 102 - Practical Algebra

    4 CR
    This course is designed for students pursuing a field of study outside of mathematics, science, and engineering. The mathematical application will be an emphasis and real-life applications will be presented in disciplinary and career context when appropriate. Topics include a review of operations with integers and rational numbers, ratios and proportions, percent, solutions of linear and quadratic equations, graphs of linear and exponential functions, linear and exponential models, introduction to data, and measures of central tendency. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® arithmetic score of at least 250, or Next Gen ACCUPLACER® quantitative reason score of at least 237, or TSMA 45  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Perform operations and order of operations with real numbers, exponents, and negative exponents.
    2. Measure and convert units of length, weight, and volume in both the Metric and US systems of measure.
    3. Develop algebraic problem-solving strategies and apply these strategies to real-world situations.
    4. Recognize proportional relationships in real-world settings and apply proportional reasoning to determine an accurate conclusion.
    5. Develop mathematical models that describe real-world, linear relationships and use these models to extrapolate and create graphs that describe these relationships.
  
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    MATH 105 - Beginning Algebra

    4 CR
    Course content includes operations on integers and rational numbers, geometric formulas, algebraic expressions, solutions of linear equations and inequalities, graphs of linear equations and linear systems, systems of linear equations in two variables, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® arithmetic score of at least 250, or Next Gen ACCUPLACER® quantitative reason score of at least 237, or TSMA 45  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Understand, interpret and use the basic symbols and words in the language of arithmetic and algebra.
    2. Use algebraic methods to solve a linear equation or inequality.
    3. Graph linear equations and inequalities in two variables.
    4. Solve systems of equations in two variables using multiple methods.
    5. Apply problem-solving strategies with applications of systems involving two variables.
    6. Factor algebraic expressions using all methods and use this skill to solve quadratic equations by factoring.
    7. Solve rational and radical equations.
    8. Simplify, multiply, divide, add and subtract real numbers, polynomials, rational expressions, and radical expressions.
  
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    MATH 111 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 1

    4 CR
    This course is designed for students majoring in elementary education and to give mathematical understandings and skills necessary to teach in elementary schools. Logical developments and structures are emphasized throughout. Topics included are sets, natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, numeration systems, calculator applications, and selected topics from number theory. Students are recommended to have a scientific calculator. Specifications will be discussed by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® quantitative reason score of at least 250, Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 237, or 1 course from MATH 105 , MATH 111, MATH 112 , MATH 115 , MATH 125 , MATH 130 , MATH 132 , MATH 140 , MATH 141 , MATH 142 , MATH 241 , or MATH 242  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Calculate basic operations on the set of real numbers, without the use of technology, at a mastery level.
    2. Apply basic definitions and relationships of sets.
    3. Calculate non-standard numeration systems and compare them with the Hindu Arabic numeration system.
    4. Apply a variety of computational algorithms to real numbers.
    5. Apply problem-solving strategies through mathematical modeling.
    6. Communicate mathematics in appropriate formats.
    7. Illustrate pedagogical concepts for arithmetic topics.
  
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    MATH 112 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 2

    4 CR
    This course is the second of a two-course sequence that is designed to develop the mathematical understandings and skills required to teach effectively in elementary schools. Logic, formal reasoning, and the use of mathematics software are emphasized throughout. Topics include statistics, probability, geometric shapes, congruence, geometric construction, and measurement. Students are recommended to have a scientific calculator. Specifications will be discussed by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MATH 111  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze properties of geometric shapes.
    2. Apply mathematical concepts of measurement.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of geometric similarity and congruence.
    4. Apply problem-solving strategies through geometric modeling.
    5. Organize and interpret numerical data.
    6. Apply the basic properties of probability.
  
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    MATH 115 - Math for Liberal Arts

    4 CR
    This is a liberal arts mathematics course designed primarily for students whose programs of study have no further mathematics requirements. Its purpose is to develop an awareness of the use of mathematics in the world around us. Emphasis will be on the communication of mathematical ideas, problem solving, applications, and the historical nature of mathematics. Specific topics for this course include logic and reasoning, the mathematics of finance and investment, probability, statistics, graph theory, and geometry.

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® quantitative reason score of at least 250, or Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 237, or 1 course from MATH 102 , MATH 105 , MATH 111 , MATH 112 , MATH 115, MATH 125 , MATH 130 , MATH 132 , MATH 140 , MATH 141 , MATH 142 , MATH 241 , or MATH 242  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Communicate mathematics in appropriate formats.
    2. Apply problem-solving strategies through mathematical modeling.
    3. Use real-world mathematical applications in context for example finances.
    4. Organize and interpret numerical data.
  
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    MATH 125 - College Algebra

    4 CR
    Topics included are polynomials, fundamental theorem of algebra, relations and functions including rational functions, logarithmic functions, exponential functions, inverse functions including graphing, and applications of each relation and function.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® quantitative reason score of at least 250, or Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 237, or 1 course from MATH 105 , MATH 111 , MATH 112 , MATH 125, MATH 132 , MATH 140 , MATH 141 , MATH 142 , MATH 241 , or MATH 242  with at least a grade of C. 
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Simplify complex rational expressions and equations that include various forms of factoring.
    2. Know multiple ways to solve and express equations in the quadratic form.
    3. Understand the purpose and execute applications of logarithms and exponential functions.
    4. Identify the fundamentals of sequences and series.
    5. Derive conic shapes from the basic circle equation.
    6. Define basic transformations of general functions.
    7. Apply the basics of matrix arithmetic.
  
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    MATH 130 - Statistics

    3 CR
    A study of basic descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, probability distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, analysis distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and linear correlation and regression. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® quantitative reason score of at least 250, or Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 237, or 1 course from MATH 102 , MATH 105 , MATH 111 , MATH 112 , MATH 115 , MATH 125 , MATH 130, MATH 132 , MATH 140 , MATH 141 , MATH 142 , MATH 241 , or MATH 242  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Represent and understand data in different types of displays.
    2. Determine simple probabilities.
    3. Create confidence intervals and apply them in context.
    4. Complete and determine the validity of hypothesis tests.
    5. Perform regression analysis for two variables.
  
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    MATH 132 - Trigonometry

    3 CR
    This course is a study of trigonometric functions, their inverses and graphs, identities, equations, radian measure, and solution of triangles. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 250, or MATH 125  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Derive and be able to replicate the Unit Circle.
    2. Describe the basics of right triangle trigonometric relationships.
    3. Graph all six trigonometric functions with transformations.
    4. Solve trigonometric equations.
    5. Prove trigonometric identities.
    6. Use properties of right and non-right triangles to find missing sides and angles in problems or applications.
  
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    MATH 140 - Preparation for Calculus

    4 CR
    Topics in this course include introductory plane geometry, algebraic functions and their graphs, introduction to the theory of equations, combinations and binomial theorem, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, and arithmetic and geometric sequences. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 263 (OR) (3) MATH 125 MATH 132 , MATH 141 , MATH 142 , MATH 241 , or MATH 242  with at least a grade of C.

     

     


    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Graph translated functions including trigonometric functions.
    2. Recognize, translate and graph parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas written in standard form.
    3. Identify zeros and the corresponding multiplicity to graph polynomial functions.
    4. Solve and graph the solution set of rational inequalities.
    5. Identify and graph vertical, horizontal and slant asymptotes.
    6. Solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
    7. Use trigonometric identities to evaluate expressions and solve equations.
    8. Use trigonometry to identify unknown lengths of angles and sides in both right triangles and oblique triangles.

  
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    MATH 141 - Calculus 1

    5 CR
    Topics in this course include limits, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, the definite integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, and applications. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® adv alg & functions score of at least 276, ALEKS mathematics score between 76 and 100, or 1 course from MATH 140 , MATH 141, MATH 142 , MATH 241 , or MATH 242  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Communicate mathematics appropriately, orally and in writing.
    2. Apply problem-solving strategies through mathematical modeling.
    3. Use real-world mathematical applications in context.
    4. Organize and interpret numeric data.
    5. Use and understand differentials, derivatives, and integrals.
  
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    MATH 142 - Calculus 2

    5 CR
    A study of the techniques of integration, limits, series, and applications. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MATH 141  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Apply the concept of the integral and how it relates area and function values.
    2. Demonstrate the concepts of infinite sequences, infinite series, power series, and Taylor series
    3. Understand L’Hôpital’s rule and how to apply L’Hôpital’s when finding limits.
    4. Demonstrate skills for integrating functions using common techniques of integration.
    5. Solve differential equations using separation of variables.
  
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    MATH 241 - Calculus 3

    4 CR
    Vector calculus, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and applications. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MATH 142  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Understand Cartesian, polar and spherical coordinates. Understand vectors and vector operations, dot and cross products, their geometric and physical meaning, use of vector algebra for solving geometric and physical problems.
    2. Understand equations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space, use of vector algebra in deriving these equations. Understand vector representation of curves (paths) in two and three dimensional spaces, derivatives and integrals of vector functions of one variable, their geometric and physical meaning.
    3. Understand vectors and vector operations in n-dimensional space, understand matrices and matrix operations, determinants, inverse and transpose matrices. Understand linear transformations and formulas for areas and volumes of parallelograms and parallelepipeds under linear transformations.
    4. Understand a concept of vector function of several variables, limit and continuity. Student should be able to check continuity of functions at a given point. Understand partial derivatives including higher order ones, a concept of differentiable function and total derivatives, chain rule. Vector analysis operations: gradients, divergence, curl, and their physical meaning. Understand approximation of functions by Taylor polynomials, use them for deriving first and second order conditions for minima and maxima.
    5. Understand line integrals, geometric and physical applications. Understand multiple integrals, their geometric and physical applications, and change of variables for multiple integrals.
  
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    MATH 242 - Differential Equations and Linear Algebra

    4 CR
    A study of elementary differential equations, including an introduction to LaPlace transforms and applications, and systems of linear equations including eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Specifications will be made by the instructor. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MATH 241  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Mathematics
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Understand differential equations as an important tool for modeling of physical and engineering processes.
    2. Understand symbolic and numerical methods for finding solutions to differential equations and for analysis of their behavior.
    3. Understand the structure of solutions of linear systems of differential equations and related concepts of linear algebra (linear algebraic systems of equations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors).
    4. Understand Laplace transform methods for finding solutions of linear differential equations.
    5. Understand concepts of stability of equilibrium solutions of nonlinear systems and methods of linearization of nonlinear systems near equilibrium.

Medical Assistant

  
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    MEAS 100 - Pharmacology for Medical Assistants

    3 CR
    This course serves to orientate the Medical Assistant student to the concepts and application of pharmacological principles. Students will focus on the principles and procedures of medication administration, including the seven rights of drug administration. Emphasis will be placed on the legal implications of drug therapy, safety, and accuracy in calculating proper dosage. Students will perform proper mechanics for parenteral administration of medications.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 240, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will have knowledge in administering medication and drawing blood.
  
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    MEAS 101 - Medical Assistant Clinical Procedures 1

    3 CR
    This is the first in a series of two clinical procedure courses that provide the necessary supervised laboratory education needed for the Medical Assistant student to perform routine procedures in the ambulatory care facility. Emphasis will be placed on practicing patient screening, safety, performing patient assessments, and the proper recording of data collected. Students will also begin collecting laboratory specimens and practice the proper procedural steps for collecting and analyzing the results of each test.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 240, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate compliance with Universal Standards and Precautions.
    2. Perform CLIA-wave laboratory tests and demonstrate documentation of procedures.
    3. Exhibit the proper use of equipment, including calibration, maintenance, and troubleshooting.
    4. Demonstrate quality assurance and quality control.
  
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    MEAS 201 - Medical Assistant Clinical Procedures 2

    3 CR
    This is the last in a series of two clinical procedure courses that provide the necessary supervised laboratory education needed for the Medical Assistant student to perform routine procedures in the ambulatory care facility. Emphasis will be placed on the continued practice of patient screening, safety, performing patient assessments, and the proper recording of data collected. Students will perform various skills needed to complete all remaining competencies required by the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB) including, auditory acuity testing, pulmonary function testing, and practice sterilization procedures using an autoclave.

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 240, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Take MEAS 100  and MEAS 101  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will have a better understanding on how to run CLIA-wave tests, draw blood, and preform capillary punctures.
  
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    MEAS 202 - Medical Assistant Practicum

    3 CR
    This course provides the Medical Assistant student with a clinical externship allowing the student to incorporate and apply knowledge and skills learned from previous courses in an ambulatory health care setting. Students will perform administrative, clinical, and laboratory duties under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor. The student will perform 160 hours in the clinical setting with an additional six-eight hours in the college laboratory to perform a final skills test.

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 240, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Take MEAS 100 , MEAS 101 , and MEAS 201  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Practice interpersonal relationships and therapeutic communication.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to perform basic medical clinical procedures, laboratory, and diagnostic testing and procedures.
    3. Perform complex procedures for medical testing on patients: venipuncture, injections, and surgical aseptic techniques.
    4. Practice administrative duties: answering phones, scheduling, and patient billing.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  
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    MRI 200 - Professional Prospectus

    1 CR
    This course serves to orientate the MRI student to the profession of medical imaging. Students will explore the integration of MRI within the encompassing health care system. The evolution of MRI as a profession will be investigated with students classifying various organizations and agencies that drive the development and continuing education of the MRI technologist’s role and responsibilities.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Characterize the healthcare industry and compare various health care professions.
    2. Identify effective communication methods and discuss the ways in which diversity can affect communication.
    3. Describe the role and responsibilities of the MRI Technologist.
    4. Characterize the educational and professional development of MRI Technology.
    5. Describe the legal and ethical implications of MRI.
  
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    MRI 201 - Computer Applications in Medical Imaging

    3 CR
    This course serves to provide the MRI student with a basic understanding of computer applications. Students will explore the components, principles, and operation of digital imaging systems, image data management, and data manipulation as it relates to the imaging department. Students will also explore the basic concepts of patient information management including medical record concerns, patient privacy, and regulatory issues.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 200 , MRI 260 , and MRI 241  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify various terms related to computer fundamentals and components.
    2. Identify and discuss the types of computer systems used in medical imaging.
    3. Define and distinguish between analog-to-digital conversion and digital signal processor.
    4. Describe and discuss the use of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in medical imaging.
    5. Identify the major components of the MRI system and the subassemblies of each.
    6. Differentiate among the various input and output devices.
    7. Identify the components of an electronic medical record and the challenges of protecting patient information.
  
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    MRI 220 - MR Physics 1

    3 CR
    This is the first in a series of two courses that provide the MRI student with a basic foundation of MRI physics. Students will explore the properties of atoms and their interactions within the magnetic field. Emphasis will be placed on the basic principles of MRI, data acquisition, and tissue characteristics in image formation.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 200 , MRI 260 , and MRI 241  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and discuss the basic principles of MRI.
    2. Identify and discuss the intrinsic parameters that affect image quality.
    3. Identify and discuss the extrinsic parameters that affect image quality.
    4. Explore the localization of the gradients and their use in signal encoding.
    5. Describe the operator control variables and discuss their impact on signal-to-noise and resolution.
  
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    MRI 222 - MR Physics 2

    3 CR
    This is the final physics course in a series of two. The course content is a continuation of Physics 1  concepts including pulse sequencing, applications, coil selection as it relates to scanning selection, calculation of scan times, scan parameters, and imaging factors. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of gradient echoes, cardiac imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, diffusion, perfusion, and spectroscopy.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 220 , MRI 230 , MRI 201 , and MRI 261  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify the differences in gradient echo types and uses.
    2. Differentiate between fast imaging capabilities of Fast Spin Echo and Echo Planar imaging.
    3. Detail and discuss the application of motion in magnetic resonance angiography imaging.
    4. Characterize perfusion and diffusion imaging as the basis for functional magnetic resonance imaging.
    5. Identify and discuss advanced cardiac sequences and hardware utilized in cardiac disease detection.
    6. Differentiate between magnet types and MR coil usage.
  
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    MRI 230 - MR Procedures and Pathophysiology 1

    3 CR
    This is the first in a series of two courses that will provide the student with considerations related to routine imaging techniques of the central nervous system (CNS) and musculoskeletal system (MSK). Students will explore the signal characteristics of normal anatomy and compare it to common pathologies. Emphasis will be placed on tissue characteristics, protocol options, and positioning considerations.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 200 , MRI 260 , and MRI 241  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Describe the MRI room and patient preparation for various examinations of the CNS and MSK.
    2. Describe patient positioning for various CNS and MSK exams.
    3. Identify when intravenous contrast is indicated for CNS and MSK exams.
    4. Describe the normal MR characteristics of various tissue structures within the CNS and MSK.
    5. Describe sequences used to optimize the visualization of pathologies.
  
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    MRI 232 - MR Procedures and Pathophysiology 2

    3 CR
    This is the final procedures and pathophysiology course in a series of two that will provide the student with considerations related to routine imaging techniques related to the abdomen, pelvis, and special imaging techniques. Students will explore the signal characteristics of normal anatomy and compare it to common pathologies. Emphasis will be placed on tissue characteristics, protocol options, and positioning considerations.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 220 , MRI 230 , MRI 201 , and MRI 261  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Describe the MRI room and patient preparation for the abdomen, pelvis, and special imaging techniques.
    2. Describe patient positioning for abdomen, pelvis, and special imaging exams.
    3. Identify when intravenous contrast is indicated for the abdomen, pelvis, and special imaging exams.
    4. Describe the normal MR characteristics of various tissue structures within the abdomen and pelvis.
    5. Describe sequences used to optimize the visualization of pathologies.
  
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    MRI 240 - Image Analysis

    3 CR
    This course provides the MRI student with the critical assessment skills necessary to recognize and identify pathology and artifacts. Students will explore the necessary parameter adjustments for differential diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on quality control procedures, image post-processing, and image archiving.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 220 , MRI 230 , MRI 201 , and MRI 261  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Evaluate and critique MRI images while following ACR guidelines.
    2. Differentiate between normal and abnormal anatomy.
    3. Identify image artifacts and discuss corrective measures.
    4. Describe advancements in the MRI profession and analyze images.
    5. Describe ways in which MRA imaging can be used to diagnose pathological conditions.
  
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    MRI 241 - Applied Sectional Anatomy

    3 CR
    This course is a study of human anatomy as seen in multiple planes. Students will review the gross anatomy of the entire body and identify anatomic structures in the axial, sagittal, coronal, and orthogonal planes. Emphasis will be applied to the appearance characteristics of each structure as seen on illustrations and photographic images correlated with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT).

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify anatomic planes and positions.
    2. Identify and discuss the anatomical structures as seen in multiple orthogonal planes on MRI and CT images.
    3. Identify the major systems of the human body and the organs associated with each system.
    4. Identify the major organs and vasculature of the body on MRI and CT images.
    5. Identify and discuss the anatomical relationship between bone, tendons, ligaments, muscles, blood vessels, and nerves.
  
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    MRI 260 - Pre-Clinical Preparation

    3 CR
    This course prepares the MRI student for safe participation in clinical education within the MRI environment. Students will explore and discuss the importance of MRI safety and patient assessment. While most of the course is delivered online, students will practice and master various safety procedures in a face-to-face workshop setting. [40-8-48] Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Detail the history of MRI.
    2. Identify MRI safety practices.
    3. Identify the importance of patient assessment and patient screening practices.
    4. Identify patient considerations that will require the MRI Technologist to use critical thinking in order to perform a diagnostic exam.
    5. Identify common drug names, common uses, effects on the body, routes of administration, and basic characteristics of contrast media used in the imaging department with an emphasis on the MRI department.
    6. Detail infection control risks as related to the MRI department.
    7. Describe the various medical equipment found within the MRI department and the quality control measures used to maintain the equipment.
    8. Demonstrate and identify the various medical procedures that occur within the MRI department.
  
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    MRI 261 - MRI Clinical Practice 1

    3 CR
    This is the first in a series of three clinical courses that provide the necessary supervised clinical education needed for the MRI student to competently apply basic protocols, recognize when to appropriately alter the standard protocol, and recognize equipment and patient considerations that affect image quality. Emphasis will be placed on patient safety and comfort while professional values, attitudes, and behaviors are upheld.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 200 , MRI 241 , and MRI 260  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Provide patient care while demonstrating professional behaviors, attitudes, and values.
    2. Perform MRI safety practices.
    3. Produce quality diagnostic images.
  
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    MRI 262 - MRI Clinical Practice 2

    3 CR
    This is the second in a series of three clinical courses that provide the necessary supervised clinical education needed for the MRI student to competently apply basic protocols, recognize when to appropriately alter the standard protocol, and recognize equipment and patient considerations that affect image quality. Emphasis will be placed on patient safety and comfort while professional values, attitudes, and behaviors are upheld.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 220 , MRI 230 , MRI 201 , and MRI 261  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Provide patient care while demonstrating professional behaviors, attitudes, and values.
    2. Perform MRI safety practices.
    3. Produce quality diagnostic images.
  
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    MRI 263 - MRI Clinical Practice 3

    3 CR
    This is the final clinical course in a series of three that provides the necessary supervised clinical education needed to complete all remaining competencies required by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) following the Primary Pathway requirements. Emphasis will be placed on patient safety and comfort while professional values, attitudes, and behaviors are upheld.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 222 , MRI 232 , MRI 240 , and MRI 262  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Provide patient care while demonstrating professional behaviors, attitudes, and values.
    2. Perform MRI safety practices.
    3. Produce quality diagnostic images.
  
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    MRI 295 - MRI Certification Exam Preparation

    3 CR
    This course provides the student with an instructional review and a self-examination process as preparation for the certification exam in MRI. Discussions will focus on the four content specifications for examination in magnetic resonance as outlined in the American Registry of Radiologic Technology (ARRT) primary pathway certification handbook. Students will have the opportunity to participate in an eight (8) hour registry review seminar.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the MRI Program required.
    Requisites: Take MRI 222 , MRI 232 , MRI 240 , and MRI 262  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Discuss and review the physical principles of image formation.
    2. Discuss and review patient care and safety.
    3. Review common pulse sequence applications to neuro, orthopedic, and torso imaging.
    4. Review techniques used in special procedures.
    5. Review and discuss imaging procedures, MRI contrast, and anatomy.

Music

  
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    MUSI 100 - Fundamentals of Music

    2 CR
    This course develops the fundamental skills necessary for reading music and understanding rhythm and melody. This course prepares the non-music reader for MUSI 130 . Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and utilize the basic elements of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, form, texture, and timbre).
    2. Demonstrate basic keyboard and vocal proficiency.
    3. Demonstrate functional working knowledge of musical terminology.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to organize musical ideas and sounds creatively.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to make aesthetic judgments.
  
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    MUSI 104 - Community Chorus

    1 CR
    Community Chorus is a non-auditioned, mixed ensemble. This ensemble seeks to explore repertoire not accessible to the average church choir. A wide range of choral music is prepared for performance throughout KCC’s district. If you enjoy singing and are looking for a congenial atmosphere to experience challenging choral literature, this is the choir for you. Everyone is welcome in this ensemble.

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Analyze a variety of musical forms, styles and genres.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 105 - Kellogg Singers

    1 CR
    Prior vocal and/or instrumental experience is recommended. Kellogg Singers is a non-auditioned chamber choir that gives students the opportunity to develop their vocal skills while performing challenging choral literature ranging from the Renaissance and Contemporary periods not generally suited for the larger choral ensemble. Special attention is given to the authenticity of stylistic performance in each of the periods and styles represented. The ensemble maintains an active performance schedule on and off-campus.

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Analyze a variety of musical forms, styles and genres.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 107 - Voice Class

    2 CR
    A study of the fundamental processes of breath control, tone production, diction, blending, and interpretation. The learning experience is augmented through the use of video and audio taping. The course is designed to benefit students interested in solo and choral singing. [0-48-48] Lab Fee

    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate the basic elements of the appoggio breathing technique (the practice of breath control).
    2. Demonstrate basic keyboard and vocal proficiency.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (fully engage in the process through a purposeful response) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Demonstrate a functional working knowledge of the process of phonation.
    5. Demonstrate the effective ways of establishing “Muscular Alertness.”
  
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    MUSI 109 - Concentus Vocal Ensemble

    1 CR
    Concentus Vocal Ensemble is a small vocal group of four to eight voices that specializes in repertoire written for advanced small ensemble singing. The group consists of singers who are selected through the annual choral audition process in the fall semester of each academic year. The group’s repertoire focuses on madrigals, chanson, lied, and a variety of vocal works from the musical theatre and show choir genre. The choir regularly performs on and off-campus. Interested students must be a registered member of the Kellogg Singers for audition/membership.

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Analyze a variety of musical forms, styles and genres.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 112 - Individualized Voice Lessons 1

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic techniques of singing.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 113 - Individualized Voice Lessons 2

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic techniques of singing.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 114 - Individualized Voice Lessons 3

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic techniques of singing.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 115 - Individualized Voice Lessons 4

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (full physical engagement in the process of singing) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of singing.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic techniques of singing.
    5. Research and analyze various vocal processes as it relates to the music being prepared for performance.
  
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    MUSI 120 - Beginning Piano Class

    2 CR
    Emphasis is on the development of basic skills in music reading, simple transposition, chord and scale structure, and elementary accompaniment techniques. [0-48-48] Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic area of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all keys of the piano keyboard.
    4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the piano and its history.
    5. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-reading music.
    6. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 121 - Intermediate Piano Class

    2 CR
    Further emphasis on the development of keyboard skills with the playing of compositions in various musical styles. [0-48-48] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MUSI 120 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic area of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all keys of the piano keyboard.
    4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the piano and its history.
    5. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-reading music.
    6. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 122 - Individualized Piano Lessons 1

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all keys of the piano keyboard.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-reading music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 123 - Individualized Piano Lessons 2

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all keys of the piano keyboard.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-reading music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 124 - Individualized Piano Lessons 3

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all keys of the piano keyboard.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-reading music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 125 - Individualized Piano Lessons 4

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all keys of the piano keyboard.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-reading music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 130 - Music Theory 1

    3 CR
    Students are required to take MUSI 132  concurrently with MUSI 130. A study of fundamentals, including notation, scales, intervals, basic chord constructions, and the rhythmic/metric aspect of music. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of basic skills necessary for the composition and harmonization of music. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Recommend prior or concurrent: Take MUSI 132 .
    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Define musical terms and concepts (meter, notation, analysis, etc.).
    2. Identify, write, and sing/play all intervals within an octave.
    3. Identify and sing major scales.
    4. Identify, write, and play major and minor triads in all inversions.
    5. Identify, write, and play diminished and augmented intervals and triads.
    6. Identify, write, and play diatonic 7th chords in root position.
  
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    MUSI 131 - Music Theory 2

    3 CR
    Students are required to take MUSI 131 concurrently with MUSI 134 . A continuation of MUSI 130  emphasizing non-harmonic tones. Introduction to diatonic seventh chords and their resolutions, borrowed chords, non-dominant seventh chords, and diatonic common chord modulations. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MUSI 130  and MUSI 132 .
    General Education Requirement: N/A
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Define musical terms and concepts (counterpoint, cadence, etc.).
    2. Identify, write, and sing/play all intervals within an octave.
    3. Identify and write seventh chords of various qualities in all inversions and in all keys.
    4. Identify, write, and play diminished and augmented intervals and triads.
    5. Understand and demonstrate proper voice-leading through chord progressions.
  
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    MUSI 132 - Aural Comprehension/Music Reading 1

    1 CR
    Students are required to take MUSI 130  concurrently with MUSI 132. A sequential course designed to develop critical listening skills in music reading with special emphasis on ear training and sight singing. Students will be encouraged to participate in computer-assisted instruction for additional assistance. [16-16-32] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MUSI 130 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Dictate a short melodic phrase after hearing the passage.
    2. Be able to distinguish and identify higher and lower pitches.
    3. Be able to sing short passages, at first sight, using solfege.
    4. Be able to perform rhythmic passages at first sight.
    5. Be able to identify intervals within an octave.
    6. Be able to identify meters, such as 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, and 6/8, and rhythmic devices, such as syncopation and hemiola.
    7. Identify larger and smaller intervals when compared with each other.
  
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    MUSI 134 - Aural Comprehension/Music Reading 2

    1 CR
    Students are required to take MUSI 131  concurrently with MUSI 134. A continuation of MUSI 132 . This course is designed to develop critical listening skills in music reading with special emphasis on ear training and sight singing. Students will be encouraged to participate in computer-assisted instruction for additional assistance. [16-16-32] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take MUSI 131 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Be able to transcribe longer phrases into musical notation, upon hearing the phrase.
    2. Identify and sing/play accurately all intervals within an octave.
    3. Identify accurately different rhythms that are played, in the compound and simple meters.
    4. Identify and write the seventh chords of various inversions.
    5. Understand and demonstrate proper voice-leading through chord progressions.
  
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    MUSI 135 - Individualized Instrumental Lessons 1

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all notes within a major and minor scale.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight read music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 136 - Individualized Instrumental Lessons 2

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all notes within a major and minor scale.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight read music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 137 - Individualized Instrumental Lessons 3

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all notes within a major and minor scale.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight read music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 138 - Individualized Instrumental Lessons 4

    2 CR
    Open to all students. Credit is given to students for individualized lessons with private music teachers employed by the College. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all notes within a major and minor scale.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight read music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 141 - Fundamentals of Music for Teaching

    3 CR
    Designed to prepare the student to use the rudiments of music through singing and playing informal instruments. Includes a survey of elementary school music texts, music listening activities, skills of music reading, and creative work in music. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and utilize the basic elements of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, form, texture, and trimbre).
    2. Demonstrate basic keyboard and vocal proficiency.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (fully engaged in the process through a purposeful response) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of listening.
    4. Demonstrate a functional working knowledge of musical terminology.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to integrate a variety of musical topics into a nonmusical subject area, through a teaching presentation.
  
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    MUSI 160 - Concert Band

    1 CR
    The concert band is an all-campus organization dedicated to the performance of fine literature. The aesthetic aspect of the music is stressed, and special emphasis is placed on musical style. This ensemble presents concerts on campus and in the surrounding community. Students participating in the ensemble are expected to practice outside of rehearsal time to ensure maximum benefit from the rehearsals. Course may be repeated for credit toward graduation up to four credit hours. [0-48-48]

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the creative process and the ability to appraise the significance of the visual, literary or performing arts.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to perform the technically demanding repertoire.
    3. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terms.
    4. Demonstrate a clear understanding of the musical concepts of style and phrasing.
    5. Demonstrate appropriate performance skills necessary for performing a wide range of repertoire.
  
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    MUSI 161 - Jazz Band

    1 CR
    The Jazz Band affords students the opportunity to develop performance skills in contemporary and traditional jazz music. This ensemble presents concerts on campus and in the surrounding community and will include music from various jazz and rock idioms. Students participating in the ensemble are expected to practice outside of rehearsal time to ensure maximum benefit from the rehearsals. Course may be repeated for credit toward graduation up to four credits. [0-48-48]

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the creative process and the ability to appraise the significance of the performing arts relative to jazz and contemporary music.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to perform the technically demanding repertoire.
    3. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terms.
    4. Demonstrate a clear understanding of the musical concepts of style and phrasing.
    5. Demonstrate appropriate performance skills necessary for performing a wide range of repertoire.
  
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    MUSI 211 - Music Appreciation

    3 CR
    This course is designed to give students the tools to listen to all types of music with greater understanding. The basic elements of music and their use in many different performance styles and cultures will be emphasized.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Distinguish the difference between active (fully engaged in the process through a purposeful response) and passive (personal enjoyment) forms of listening.
    4. Analyze a variety of musical forms, styles and genres.
    5. Research and analyze a musical historical period, genre, and or element.
  
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    MUSI 240 - Music in Early Childhood

    3 CR
    This course will develop an understanding of the musical development of young children. The development of actual teaching skills in addition to theoretical knowledge will be an integral part of this course. These teaching skills will be developed through the required lab and field experience. [32-16-48]

    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate their ability to identify and utilize the basic elements of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, form, texture and timbre).
    2. Assess and evaluate the historical, philosophical, psychological, and social foundations of early childhood education for demonstrating an understanding of how these foundations influence current thought and practice.
    3. Create a personal educational philosophy.
    4. Demonstrate a functional working knowledge of key developmental milestones for young children.
    5. Prepare a teaching demonstration that incorporates the various aspects of musical integration into a nonmusical focused setting.
  
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    MUSI 250 - Music History 1

    3 CR
    Music from antiquity through the Baroque. Literature and theory of vocal and instrumental music leading up to the classical time period.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the creative process and the ability to appraise the significance of visual, literary, or performing arts.
    2. Identify basic materials, techniques, compositional elements, or principles used in the production of creative musical works.
    3. Interpret the overall content and aesthetics of creative musical works.
    4. Evaluate the relationship between creative works and the human experience including culture, society and technology.
    5. Recognize and assess the fundamental characteristics of the creative process.
  
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    MUSI 260 - Basic Conducting

    2 CR
    The course develops the fundamental skills necessary for conducting, including beat patterns; use of left-hand gestures for attack, release, etc.; and score preparation and reading. Students will conduct both in the classroom and in sessions with the college ensembles.

    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify all notes within a major and minor scale.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-read music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 270 - Sacred Choral Literature

    3 CR
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with a brief history of sacred music, as well as the sacred music of today. Emphasis will be placed on literature usable by choirs with a non-traditional balance of parts. This course will also address methods of adapting published arrangements for specific choirs.

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Take MUSI 260  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify, and demonstrate listening and aural skill mastery in the basic areas of the musical language.
    2. Demonstrate a working vocabulary of musical terminology.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify and review a large body of repertoire for a variety of choral voicings, including Unison, SA, SSA, TB, TTB, SAB, and SATB.
    4. Demonstrate through performance the basic ability to sight-read choral music.
    5. Demonstrate and articulate appropriate practice and performance techniques.
  
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    MUSI 297 - Music Special Topics

    2 CR
    This course is designed to allow the students to explore focus areas in music such as conducting, multicultural, choral repertoire, and show choir techniques. Since topics change this course may be repeated for credit toward graduation up to six credits.

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Operatic Performance Technique: Effectively demonstrate the appropriate performance techniques required to sing art songs and operatic arias from the western classical vocal traditions.
    2. Class Performance: Effectively apply key skills (language, breath control, diction, etc…) in the performance of songs or arias in the class.

Neurodiagnostic Technologist

  
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    EEGT 100 - Neuroanatomy and Physiology

    3 CR
    This course provides an introduction to neuroanatomy and physiology necessary for working in the diverse field of Neurodiagnostics. Students will discuss the structures and functions of the Nervous System. Topics include the Central Nervous System, Peripheral Nervous System, and blood supply.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and label anatomical structures in the brain and central nervous system.
    2. Identify anatomical position, body regions, and body planes.
    3. Discuss the function of the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system.
    4. Describe the relationship between neuroanatomy and the completion of the Neurodiagnostic exam.
  
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    EEGT 101 - Introduction to Neurodiagnostic Procedures

    3 CR
    This course provides an introduction to the routine neurodiagnostic testing procedures performed. Students will discuss the Scope of Practice specific to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist. Topics will include medical terminology, diagnostic procedures, and common neurological disorders.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate proper use of medical terminology as it relates to the neurodiagnostic exams.
    2. Differentiate between the various diagnostic test performed by the EEG technologist.
    3. Discuss Scope of Practice.
    4. Identify common neurological disorders diagnosed by EEG technology.
    5. Identify the various brain patterns and EEG waveforms.
  
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    EEGT 102 - Electroencephalogram Applications

    3 CR
    This course provides the basic skills necessary to accurately measure and apply electrodes. Students will discuss the standards for electrode placement based on the International 10-20 System of Electrode Placement. Topics will include skin preparation, skin safety, and modification techniques.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Discuss the theory of the International 10-20 System of Electrode Placement.
    2. Identify each electrode location based on the 10-20 system.
    3. Demonstrate measurement of the head using the 10-20 system.
    4. Discuss the reasons for modification techniques.
    5. Discuss the common mistakes made during electrode placement.
  
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    EEGT 120 - EEG Pre-Clinical Preparation

    3 CR
    This course prepares the EEG student for safe participation in clinical education within the neurodiagnostic department. Students will explore and discuss the importance of patient safety, patient assessment, and equipment placement. While most of the course is delivered online, students will practice and master various procedures in a scheduled laboratory setting.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist Program required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Discuss patient safety concerns during the EEG procedure.
    2. Demonstrate proper documentation.
    3. Discuss the equipment required to perform the EEG procedure.
    4. Demonstrate measurement of the head using the 10-20 system.
    5. Discuss infection control procedures.
    6. Identify the protocol for medical emergencies.
  
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    EEGT 130 - Principles of Electroencephalogram

    2 CR
    This course explores the history of electroencephalograms (EEG). Students will discuss the use of EEGs in the diagnosis of neurological diseases. Topics will include the national competency standards for performing EEGs, fundamentals of patient care, and HIPPA compliance.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist Program required.
    Requisites: Take EEGT 100 , EEGT 101 , EEGT 102 , and EEGT 120  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Discuss the history of EEG.
    2. Identify the national competency standards for performing EEG.
    3. Discuss the essentials of patient screening.
    4. Describe ways to identify a patient in distress.
    5. Discuss the importance of HIPPA compliance both in the clinical setting and classroom.
  
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    EEGT 131 - Principles of Electricity and Electrical Safety

    1 CR
    This course familiarizes the Neurodiagnostic student with the principles of electricity and electrical safety. Students will discuss digital EEG, EEG recordings, and the digital EEG display. Topics will include risks related to current, grounding, and factors contributing to electrical injury.

    Additional Information: Formal admission to the Neurodiagnostic Technologist (NDT) Program required.
    Requisites: Take EEGT 100 , EEGT 101 , EEGT 102 , and EEGT 120  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Describe the differences between digital to analog equipment.
    2. Identify the basic components of the computerized EEG system.
    3. Discuss skills related to digital recording techniques.
    4. Discuss troubleshooting techniques.
    5. Explain the routine maintenance requirements for the EEG system.
 

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