Jul 06, 2022  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECE 262 - Topics in Early Childhood 2

    2 CR
    This course broadens student knowledge through selected topics and issues pertaining to early childhood. Topics may include administration, nutrition, activities, or legal and ethical issues. Each student may be required to spend one to three clock hours observing and working with young children outside of scheduled class times. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Recommend developmentally appropriate STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) tools and materials that can be used in early childhood programs.
    2. Design developmentally appropriate STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) learning experiences that actively engage young children.
    3. Engage families in their child’s STEM learning.

Economics

  
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    ECON 201 - Principles of Economics-MACRO

    3 CR
    A study of the American economic system including the basic tenets of the private enterprise system; national income accounting, economic instability, unemployment inflation; modern theory of income employment, employment and prices; fiscal and monetary policy; banking system (including the Federal Reserve); and related contemporary macroeconomic issues. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Explain basic economic theories and understand their application to economic policy issues.
    2. Identify and explain basic economic terms and methods used to measure economic activity.
    3. Explain the role of supply and demand within the U.S. economy.
    4. Identify factors that affect the demand for goods and services.
    5. Explain the costs of production and their impact on employment and capital decisions.
    6. Investigate the types of market structures and how they impact business activity and profit.
    7. Determine the role of labor, its impact and costs related to business and production decisions.
    8. Explore the policy options related to taxation and transfer payments.
    9. Examine the role and characteristics of financial markets.
    10. Assess the impact of the global economy and its impact on domestic economic policy.
  
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    ECON 202 - Principles of Economics-MICRO

    3 CR
    A study of supply and demand analysis; costs of production; the structure of American industry; resource pricing; and contemporary microeconomic issues that will include labor economics, urban and rural problems, income distribution, antitrust problems, and international economic issues. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Recognize the importance of economic models.
    2. Analyze the opportunity cost and how this concept can be applied.
    3. Use supply and demand analysis to predict changes in price/quantities in markets.
    4. Determine how elasticity affects consumer demand and firms’ production decisions.
    5. Apply the relationship between production and costs to determine the profit-maximizing output of firms in different market types.

Education

  
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    EDUC 200 - Foundations of Education

    3 CR
    This course introduces students to the historical, sociological, philosophical, and legal foundations of American education with a focus on education issues and cross-cultural comparison. Special emphasis is placed on the professional responsibilities of teachers. Students are required to complete seven (7) clock hours of field experiences comprised of classroom observations in pre-K through twelfth grade settings in public and private schools. A successful Central Abuse and Neglect Registry clearance must be submitted prior to completing the field experience. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  or ENGL 151 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze the characteristics of effective teachers and schools.
    2. Evaluate the teaching profession and motives for becoming a teacher.
    3. Analyze the impact of social issues on student performance.
    4. Examine curriculum organization and instructional approaches.
    5. Utilize the Michigan Department of Education as a professional teaching resource.
    6. Apply knowledge gathered from professional education sources to personal experiences.
  
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    EDUC 204 - Exceptional Learner in School-Age Environments

    3 CR
    Students learn how to support school-age children and adolescents who are exceptional learners in academic environments focusing on kindergarten through 12th grade. Topics include historical, psychological, social and academic perspectives. Individualization, assessment, and intervention programming are studied. This course builds upon ECE 237 ; however, each course can be taken independently of the other. Students are required to complete at least six clock hours of observations in the K-12th grade classroom settings. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  or ENGL 151 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Contrast different disabilities, developmental delays, and special abilities of K-12 students.
    2. Discover adaptations and instructional techniques that can be tailored to meet each student’s individual needs.
    3. Analyze and intentionally apply results gathered from anecdotal records to support positive growth and development for K-12 students with special needs.
    4. Argue the importance of involving each family in assessing the K-12 student’s needs, setting individual goals, and updating the child’s progress in an ongoing manner.
    5. Characterize the IEP process, the family involvement, features that make the document well written, and the importance of following the team’s planning for each individual K-12 student with a disability.
    6. Analyze the laws related to K-12 students with disabilities, including the IDEA (and amendments) and ADA.
  
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    EDUC 240 - Education Trends

    3 CR
    This course evaluates the American educational system’s historical and global education issues and how they impact society. The focus is on the study of social issues related to educational trends. Special emphasis is placed on addressing community needs and producing civically engaged students. Students learn how to reflect on personal views regarding critical trends in education explaining how these views relate to the world around them.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  or ENGL 151 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Examine historical factors of the American educational system.
    2. Evaluate social issues and their relationship to educational trends.
    3. Investigate the role of the American school system in the local community, in regards to addressing community needs and producing civically-engaged students.
    4. Reflect on personal views and philosophy regarding critical issues/trends in education.
    5. Analyze qualitative and/or quantitative facts of educational trends adversely impacting K-12 education.
  
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    EDUC 252 - Field Experience 1

    1 CR
    Students will need to successfully pass a criminal background check and a State of Michigan Department of Human Services Child Abuse and Neglect Registry (CANR) according to College and Department policy. This course provides an opportunity for the student interested in the profession of teaching to gain experience in a local school system.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Requisites: Take EDUC 200 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Implement your role as an education professional in work habits, knowledge of the field, and interactions with students and staff.
    2. Assist classroom staff to gain an understanding of roles, responsibilities, and classroom procedures.
    3. Show respect toward students in all interactions and establish an accepting social and emotional environment.
    4. Practice appropriate guidance strategies, such as conflict resolution, encouragement, and problem-solving.
    5. Seek opportunities and experiences to promote professional growth.
    6. Design and implement learning experiences and teaching strategies that provide for the inclusion of all students.
    7. Apply best practices and techniques when completing at least 20 clock-hours of field experience in a local school system.
  
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    EDUC 253 - Field Experience 2

    2 CR
    Students will need to successfully pass a criminal background check and a State of Michigan Department of Human Services Child Abuse and Neglect Registry (CANR) according to College and Department policy. This course provides an opportunity for the student interested in the profession of teaching to gain experience in a local school system.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Requisites: Take EDUC 200 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Implement your role as an education professional in work habits, knowledge of the field, and interactions with students and staff.
    2. Assist classroom staff to gain an understanding of roles, responsibilities, and classroom procedures.
    3. Show respect toward students in all interactions and establish an accepting social and emotional environment.
    4. Practice appropriate guidance strategies, such as conflict resolution, encouragement, and problem-solving.
    5. Seek opportunities and experiences to promote professional growth.
    6. Design and implement learning experiences and teaching strategies that provide for the inclusion of all students.
    7. Apply best practices and techniques when completing at least forty-five clock-hours of field experience in a local school system.

Emergency Medical Technician

  
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    EMT C300 - AHA BLS Certification

    0.5 CEU CR
    The American Heart Association (AHA) Basic Life Support (BLS) certification course is a classroom-based certification course in which health care professionals learn to recognize several life-threatening emergencies, provide CPR to victims of all ages, use an AED, and relieve choking in a safe, timely and effective manner.

  
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    EMT C350 - AHA BLS Instructor

    3.2 CEU CR
    The American Heart Association (AHA) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Instructor Course is a 32-hour program designed to provide the student with the training necessary to conduct any of the American Heart Association Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS) CPR courses which are offered. This course includes an overview of BCLS instruction, teaching strategies, safety/health concerns, teaching outlines, organizational strategies, mannequin maintenance/troubleshooting/repair, and criteria for evaluating the CPR student. Students taking this course will be required to take a written and practical skills test. Students will be required to present a mini-lecture on a BCLS skill (cognitive or psychomotor). Certification will be given to students after they complete a practicum. This course is based on the 2001 guidelines. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Current (within 1 year) certification in Course C (CPR) from the American Heart Association.
  
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    EMT 101 - Advanced First Aid and CPR

    2 CR
    This course leads to certification in First Aid and CPR through the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons American College of Emergency Physicians and the American Heart Association Healthcare Provider. The course will prepare you to recognize when an emergency situation exists and how to properly care for the patient until professional help arrives. Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform proper emergency medical care as a certified First Aid and CPR Provider.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a certified First Aid and CPR Provider.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a certified First Aid and CPR Provider.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a certified First Aid and CPR Provider.
  
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    EMT 110 - Medical First Responder Training

    3 CR
    The Medical First Responder Course is designed to provide licensure for the student with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services as a medical first responder. This course is based on the current medical first responder curriculum as established by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Division. Students who successfully complete the requirements of this course will be eligible for licensure as medical first responders with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Division. This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge of what to do for a patient prior to the arrival of an ambulance. This course is designed for anyone who may be required to provide care for a sick or injured individual prior to the arrival of an ambulance. This includes (but is not limited to) firefighters, police officers, and first response team members. The course includes training in CPR; bleeding control; airway management; splinting; extrication; oxygen therapy; and medical, environmental, and other emergencies. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as a Medical First Responder practitioner would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Medical First Responder practitioner.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a Medical First Responder practitioner.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Medical First Responder practitioner.
  
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    EMT 120 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician Didactic

    8 CR
    This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician in the State of Michigan. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Section. Topics include legal responsibilities, anatomy, physiology, patient assessment, management of various emergency situations, extrication, and current standards for Basic EMTs in the field. This course is based on the 1996 updated requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training.

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will relate and perform as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician.
    3. Students will communicate and behave with patients needing emergency medical care as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician.
  
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    EMT 121 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician Skills Lab

    2.25 CR
    This course is designed to complement the didactic material learned in the EMT 120  course with the hands-on skills required to perform as a Basic EMT. Students will learn and practice skills such as CPR, patient assessment, splinting, airway management, automatic defibrillation, bleeding management, medical antishock trouser application, and IV maintenance. Students will also participate in scenario-based education and computer-based testing and scenarios to reinforce skills learned within this area. [0-72-72] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take EMT 120 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will relate and perform as an Emergency Medical Technician would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as an Emergency Medical Technician.
    3. Students will communicate and behave with patients needing emergency medical care as an Emergency Medical Technician.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as an Emergency Medical Technician.
  
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    EMT 122 - Defensive Emergency Driving/AllSafe

    1 CR
    The College reserves the right to refuse the driving component to any individual whose driving record does not meet standards of the institution where the driving component is practiced. A course to prepare the licensed EMT (any level) with the defensive driving skills required by the EMS profession. Included in this course are information on AllSafe, defensive driving, tactics, laws regarding the operation of an emergency vehicle, and practice in driving. This course includes an eight-hour practice-driving component. [12-8-20] Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Candidates who enroll in this course will have their driving record checked by KCC.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as an emergency vehicle driver would while responding to an emergency with an emergency response vehicle. This vehicle may be simulated and/or real.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate the best routes to an emergency when given an address to respond to.
    3. Students will communicate with partners and instructors their intended routes and actions while responding to any given address in an emergency.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent actions so as to keep themselves, their partners, the public and potential patients safe during an emergency response.
  
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    EMT 123 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician Clinical Internship

    0.75 CR
    This course is designed for students to observe and participate in the clinical experiences in both the pre-hospital and hospital settings. Students must complete a minimum of six eight-hour experiences in the hospital emergency room and in a pre-hospital life support agency. Students must have an android tablet/phone or iPhone with a camera and touchscreen to participate in this course. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Hepatitis-B inoculation/declination form.
    Requisites: Take EMT 120 , EMT 121 , and EMT 122 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as a Basic EMT practitioner would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Basic EMT practitioner.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a Basic EMT practitioner.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Basic EMT practitioner.
  
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    EMT 130 - Basic EMT 1

    8.75 CR
    This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician in Michigan. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Section. Topics include legal responsibilities, anatomy, physiology, patient assessment, management of various emergency situations, extrication, and current standards for Basic EMTs in the field. This course is based on the requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Section. This course is part of a three-semester offering of the Basic EMT Program. This course includes certification in Basic Life Support through the American Heart Association.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Describe the roles of EMS in the health care system.
    2. Demonstrate the professional attributes expected of EMTs.
    3. Perform the roles and responsibilities of an EMT with regard to personal safety and wellness, as well as the safety of others.
    4. Perform the duties of an EMT with regard for medical-legal and ethical issues, including functioning under medical direction and within the national scope of practice.
    5. Apply principles of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, life-span development, and therapeutic communications to the assessment and management of patients.
    6. Identify the need for and perform immediately life-saving interventions to manage a patient’s airway, breathing, and circulation.
    7. Assess and manage patients of all ages with a variety of complaints, medical conditions and traumatic injuries.
    8. Apply principles of emergency medical services operations, including considerations in ambulance and air medical transportation, multiple casualty incidents, gaining access to and extricating patients, hazardous materials incidents, and responding to situations involving weapons of mass destruction.
  
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    EMT 133 - Basic EMT 2

    8.25 CR
    A continuation of EMT 130 . This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician in Michigan. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Section. Topics include legal responsibilities, anatomy, physiology, patient assessment, management of various emergency situations, extrication, and current standards for Basic EMTs in the field. This course is based on the requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services EMS Section. This course is part of a three-semester offering of the Basic EMT Program. This course includes certification in Basic Life Support through the American Heart Association.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will relate and perform as a Medical First Responder would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Medical First Responder.
    3. Students will communicate and behave with patients needing emergency medical care as a Medical First Responder.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Medical First Responder.
  
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    EMT 200 - Pharmacology 1

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide the paramedic students with a knowledge of basic pharmacological principles, biological factors influencing drug actions, predictable effects of drugs on physiologic problems, modifiers of predictable effects, commonalities and variations between the actions of drugs employed for comparable therapeutic effect, adverse effects of drugs that can and do commonly occur, and application for pharmacological therapy in the pre-hospital setting. Concentration will focus on cardiovascular drugs in this semester.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will identify medications by the chemical make, generic name, trade name and official name.
    2. Students will distinguish common pharmacological terminology and abbreviations.
    3. Students will be able to calculate a proper medication dose.
    4. Students will formulate a pharmacological treatment plan for a patient suffering from an emergency.
  
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    EMT 205 - Pharmacology 2

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide pharmacological information on the remaining non-cardiac drugs, which a paramedic will experience in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. This course is based on the Paramedic Education program requirements as set by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Requisites: Take EMT 200  with at least a grade of C-.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will identify medications by the chemical make, generic name, trade name, and official name.
    2. Students will distinguish common pharmacological terminology and abbreviations.
    3. Students will be able to calculate a proper medication dose.
    4. Students will formulate a pharmacological treatment plan for a patient suffering from an emergency.
  
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    EMT 211 - Cardiology 1

    2 CR
    This is a course designed to provide knowledge in cardiology to fulfill the needs of the Paramedic Program. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as stated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support standards. Topics include: rapid interpretation of EKGs, static recognition of EKGs, electrical therapy, pharmacological therapy, and basic algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will identify lead II EKG rhythms by the pacemaker location and corresponding rhythm identification guidelines.
    2. Students will distinguish cardiac anatomy and physiology in relation to the EKG.
    3. Students will formulate a treatment plan for a patient suffering from a cardiac emergency.
  
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    EMT 216 - Cardiology 2

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide knowledge in cardiology to fulfill the needs of the Paramedic program. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as stated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support standards. Topics include pathophysiology of heart disorders, multi-lead EKG interpretation, and therapeutic modalities.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Requisites: Take EMT 211  with at least a grade of C-.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will interpret multi-lead EKG presentations by corresponding identification criteria and guidelines.
    2. Students will distinguish cardiac anatomy and physiology in relation to the EKG.
    3. Students will formulate a treatment plan for a patient suffering from a cardiac emergency.
  
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    EMT 221 - Paramedic 1

    5 CR
    This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a Paramedic in Michigan. This course includes patient assessment techniques and concepts, advanced airway management, fluid and shock resuscitation, acid/base and body buffer systems, and multi-systems trauma treatments. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and Calhoun County Medical Control Authority. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze patients suffering from respiratory emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the respiratory emergency patient.
    4. Students will analyze patients suffering from traumatic emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    5. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the traumatic patient.
  
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    EMT 225 - Paramedic 2

    4 CR
    This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a Paramedic in Michigan. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and Calhoun County Medical Control Authority. Topics include advanced life support in gynecological emergencies, emergency management, gastrointestinal emergencies, lab test analysis, and other medical emergencies.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze patients suffering from medical emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the medical patient.
  
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    EMT 230 - Paramedic Advanced Practice

    4 CR
    This course provides the paramedic student the knowledge in the transport of patients with special considerations and advanced EMT operations as prescribed in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Paramedic Curriculum. Students will take a comprehensive exam at the conclusion of this course for certification by Kellogg Community College. This certification can be used as evidence of completion for the National Registry Exam (passage of which leads to licensing in most U.S. states).

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze patients suffering from special consideration emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will distinguish components of ambulance operations within an EMS system.
    4. Students will formulate the implementation of the incident management system.
  
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    EMT 235 - Paramedic Pediatric Advance Life Support

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide the Paramedic student with the skills and knowledge to handle pediatric emergencies in the pre-hospital setting. Pediatric patients are not treated as young adults. They are a distinct population with different responses to injuries than adults. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze pediatric patients suffering from a medical emergency and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the pediatric emergency patient.
    4. Students will analyze pediatric patients suffering from a traumatic emergency and make positive choices to help the patient.
    5. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the traumatic pediatric patient.
  
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    EMT 240 - Skills Lab 1

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide the Paramedic student with the skills as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) for the Paramedic curriculum. This course includes skill practice and scenarios (computer, simulation, and classroom). This course is part of the Paramedic curriculum and must be taken with EMT 245  within the same year of instruction. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of a Paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will demonstrate the application of lifesaving skills performed by the Paramedic.
    3. Students will analyze patients suffering from medical and traumatic emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    4. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for medical and traumatic emergency patients.
  
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    EMT 245 - Skills Lab 2

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide the Paramedic student with the skills as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) for the Paramedic curriculum. This course includes skill practice and scenarios (computer, simulation, and classroom). This course is part of the Paramedic curriculum and must be taken with EMT 240  within the same year of instruction. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of a paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will demonstrate the application of lifesaving skills performed by the paramedic.
    3. Students will analyze patients suffering from medical and traumatic emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    4. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for medical and traumatic emergency patients.
  
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    EMT 251 - Introduction to the Clinical Experience

    1 CR
    This course is designed to provide the first semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital, and skilled care facilities. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review the progress of the students. Clinical education represents the most important component of paramedic education since this is where the student learns to synthesize cognitive and psychomotor skills. To be effective, clinical education will integrate and reinforce the didactic and skills laboratory components of the program. Clinical instruction will follow sound educational principles, be logically sequenced to proceed from simple to complex tasks, have specific objectives, and be closely supervised and evaluated. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of a Paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze patients suffering from medical emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the medical patient.
  
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    EMT 252 - Paramedic Clinical Experience 1

    2 CR
    This course is designed to provide the second-semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital, and skilled care facilities. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review the progress of the students.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as a Paramedic practitioner would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
  
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    EMT 255 - Paramedic Clinical Experience 2

    3.5 CR
    This course is designed to provide the second-semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital, and skilled care facilities. Included in this course is 7 hours of meeting and lecture time with the clinical coordinator, 28 hours of simulation time to aid the students in meeting their required clinical competencies, and 140 hours of time in the clinical environment. Classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review the progress of the students. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as a Paramedic practitioner would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
  
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    EMT 260 - Paramedic Internship

    5 CR
    This course is designed to provide the Field Internship as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Transportation and the requirements of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Paramedic curriculum. This course is the last course taken as part of the Paramedic Program. This course includes clinical rotations at ambulance services as the lead Paramedic under the supervision of a field Paramedic. Students are expected to complete their clinical competencies during this class. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review the progress of the students. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Requisites: (1) Take EMT 230  and EMT 235  with at least a grade of C- (AND) (2) Take EMT 255  with at least a grade of P.
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as a Paramedic practitioner would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a Paramedic practitioner.
  
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    EMT 261 - Paramedic Field Prep

    1.5 CR
    This course is designed to prepare the Paramedic student for a leadership role during the clinical field internship. This course will certify the student in Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, and Trauma Advanced Life Support. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and Calhoun County Medical Control Authority. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will perform as a lead Paramedic practitioner would giving emergency medical care.
    2. Students will formulate and integrate emergency medical care as a lead Paramedic practitioner.
    3. Students will communicate with patients needing emergency medical care as a lead Paramedic practitioner.
    4. Students will synthesize information to formulate competent emergency medical care as a lead Paramedic practitioner.
  
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    EMT 286 - EMS Instructor/Coordinator Training Practicum

    10 CR
    The EMS Instructor Coordinator course will include student participation in classroom and online course work along with guided student teaching to prepare the student for licensure as an EMS Instructor Coordinator within the State of Michigan. Following successful completion of this course, the student will be recommended for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services licensure. This course is based on the U.S. Department of Transportation National Standard Curriculum for an instructor training program.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of an EMS Instructor Coordinator.
    2. Students will formulate and present a lesson plan for an EMS class.
    3. Students will evaluate various teaching methods with the goal of improving personal teaching skills.
  
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    EMT 292 - UMBC Critical Care Emergency Medical Transport

    7 CR
    This course is the nationally accepted University of Maryland-Baltimore County Critical Care Emergency Transport Program. This course is designed to prepare paramedics and nurses to function as members of a critical care transport team. Critical patients that must be transported between facilities require a different level of care from hospital or emergency field patients. Participants will gain an understanding of the special needs of critical patients during transport, become familiar with the purpose and mechanisms of hospital procedures and equipment, and develop the skills to maintain the stability of hospital equipment and procedures during transport. Topics include the critical care environment, breathing management, surgical airway management, hemodynamic management, cardiac management, pharmacological management, GI, GU and renal management, neurological management, complications of transport, and special considerations. This course is based on the updated 2011 curriculum as prescribed by the UMBC. It is highly recommended that students taking courses are currently licensed as a Paramedic or Registered Nurse, have BLS Provider, ACLS, ITLS/TNCC/PhTLS, PALS certifications and at least two years of field experience. Lab fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of a Critical Care Paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze patients suffering from a respiratory emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the respiratory emergency patient.
    4. Students will analyze patients suffering from a traumatic emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    5. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the traumatic patient.
  
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    EMT 295 - UMBC Pediatric/Neonatal Critical Care Transport Course

    4.25 CR
    This intensive one-week course is designed to prepare experienced paramedics, nurses, and respiratory therapists to function as members of a pediatric and neonatal critical care support team. This course is based on the nationally accepted University of Maryland-Baltimore County course in pediatric/neonatal care. Participants will gain an understanding of the special needs of critical patients during transport, become familiar with the purpose and mechanisms of hospital procedures and equipment, and develop the skills to maintain the stability of hospital equipment and procedures during transport. In addition, this course may serve as a springboard for those institutions looking to expand into pediatric critical care.

    Additional Information: Two years documented experience in critical care environment.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of a Pediatric Critical Care Paramedic within an EMS system.
    2. Students will analyze patients suffering from respiratory emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    3. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the respiratory emergency patient.
    4. Students will analyze patients suffering from traumatic emergencies and make positive choices to help the patient.
    5. Students will formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the traumatic patient.

English

  
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    ENGL 151 - Freshman Composition

    3 CR
    Writing expository prose with emphasis on the thesis sentence, idea development, unity, continuity, coherence, patterns of exposition, and educated usage. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® writing score of at least 250, or TSEN 95  with at least a grade of C (OR) (3) ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 106, and ACCUPLACER® ESL listening score of 106, and ACCUPLACER® ESL reading skills score of 106 (OR) (4) ELL 93 , ELL 94 , and ELL 95  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: English Composition
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Use rhetorical contexts to guide the development of appropriate written responses.
    2. Evaluate key characteristics that may impact a text message and a text suitability for a particular purpose.
    3. Implement composing processes to develop and finalize essays.
    4. Apply knowledge of academic writing conventions.
  
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    ENGL 151H - Freshman Composition - Honors

    3 CR
    The intellectually-able student is permitted to pursue in-depth studies in expository writing. The student must be interested in developing excellence in writing. Lab Fee

    Additional Information: Students may enter the Honors course only as part of the Honors Program or with department approval.


    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® writing score of at least 276.
    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: English Composition
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Use rhetorical contexts to guide the development of appropriate written responses.
    2. Evaluate key characteristics that may impact a text’s message and a text’s suitability for a particular purpose.
    3. Implement composing processes to develop and finalize essays.
    4. Apply knowledge of academic writing conventions.
    5. Integrate college writing into a variety of applications.

    Honors Outcomes:

    1. Collaborate in college, local, and global communities.
    2. Demonstrate expertise and research skills in select areas of study.
    3. Develop an interdisciplinary perspective across the liberal arts and sciences.
    4. Demonstrate intellectual independence through verbal and written work.
    5. Demonstrate research skills, including analysis of information and perspectives from diverse sources.
    6. Develop plans and skills to further both academic and professional careers.

  
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    ENGL 152 - Freshman Composition

    3 CR
    A continuation of ENGL 151 , including research writing, examination, and discussion of selected readings. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take ENGL 151  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: English Composition
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the process of writing academically viable research essays.
    2. Utilize resources and strategies for locating academic sources, and employ techniques for accurate documentation.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of guidelines governing APA and MLA style conventions.
    4. Apply critical reading skills to published works, peer essays, and personal drafts of research essays.
  
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    ENGL 152H - Freshman Composition - Honors

    3 CR
    A continuation of ENGL 151  or ENGL 151H  with emphasis on the preparation and writing of a research paper on a challenging topic. Analysis of fiction and nonfiction selections to refine critical thinking skills. Honors courses emphasize individual study, personal, and group projects with additional learning outcomes common to the Honors Program.

    Additional Information: Students may enter the Honors course only as part of the Honors Program or with department approval.


    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: English Composition
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the process of writing academically viable research essays.
    2. Utilize resources and strategies for locating academic sources, and employ techniques for accurate documentation.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of guidelines governing APA and MLA style conventions.
    4. Apply critical reading skills to published works, peer essays, and personal drafts of research essays.

    Honors Outcomes:

    1. Collaborate in college, local, and global communities.
    2. Demonstrate expertise and research skills in select areas of study.
    3. Develop an interdisciplinary perspective across the liberal arts and sciences.
    4. Demonstrate intellectual independence through verbal and written work.
    5. Demonstrate research skills, including analysis of information and perspectives from diverse sources.
    6. Develop plans and skills to further both academic and professional careers.

  
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    ENGL 153 - Technical English

    3 CR
    Instruction and practice in writing for industry and technology. Emphasis is on meeting the written communication needs for the technical student. Lab Fee

    Requisites: (1) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55  (AND) (2) Next Gen ACCUPLACER® writing score of at least 250, or TSEN 95  with at least a grade of C.
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: English Composition
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Communicate ideas and opinions clearly and correctly for a variety of readers and purposes through writing and speaking.
    2. Examine a written or spoken word and recognize purpose, meaning, and main ideas; locate additional information sources and apply that information in research or problem-solving.
    3. Use listening and speaking skills in interpersonal communications, one-to-one, and in a group, with accuracy, insight, and effectiveness in a variety of settings, including online communication.
    4. Distinguish between fact and opinion, and recognize biases and fallacies in reasoning.
    5. Use systematic, critical, and creative processes to identify problems, analyze alternative solutions, and make decisions, individually and in collaboration with others, in a clear, logical and consistent manner.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to effectively use computers to achieve a personal or professional goal.
    7. Apply properly the principles of direct letters, indirect letters, persuasive letters, and memoranda.
  
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    ENGL 203 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    3 CR
    Designed to introduce students to the basic elements that govern the creation of short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Emphasis is on the development of creative style and the development of craft in handling poetic form.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: English Composition
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Deconstruct professional and student writing for the purposes of craft.
    2. Create original work in multiple genres.
    3. Implement composing processes to develop and finalize a body of work for publication.

English Language Learning

  
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    ELL 73 - Introductory Reading and Writing

    4 CR
    This course has an emphasis on strengthening reading and writing skills. Students will develop reading comprehension skills in English. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary development, active reading strategies including context clues, transitions and identifying supporting statements. Grammar and vocabulary introduced in class will be used to produce well-formed sentences and paragraphs. Students must satisfactorily complete their work with a 73% or higher before advancing to a higher level reading and writing course.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL reading score of 51 (AND) (2) ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 51.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Read and comprehend texts.
    2. Write paragraphs and short papers.
    3. Apply and understand academic words and terms.
    4. Expand vocabulary.
    5. Draw meaning from inferences.
    6. Locate the main ideas within a text.
  
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    ELL 74 - Introductory Grammar and Communication

    4 CR
    This class emphasizes improving grammar skills in written and oral communication. Students will study English vocabulary and grammar to expand upon their ability to understand and use spoken and written English. Special attention is given to the appropriate use of the forms studied, including verbs, nouns, pronouns, tense, and gerunds. Students must satisfactorily complete their work before advancing to a higher-level grammar and communication course.

    Requisites: ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 51.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Develop fluency in writing and speaking.
    2. Increase grammatical accuracy in writing and speaking.
    3. Self-edit for accuracy in writing and speaking.
    4. Develop awareness of the relationship of grammar to meaning.
  
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    ELL 75 - Introductory Speaking and Listening

    4 CR
    The focus of this course is on aural and oral communication skills. There will be an emphasis on skills such as making inferences, recognizing time markers, using suffixes and prefixes, note-taking, and intonation. Students must satisfactorily complete their work with a grade of “C” before advancing to a higher level speaking and listening course.

    Requisites: ACCUPLACER® ESL Listening use score of 51.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Communicate with and comprehend English speakers.
    2. Communicate with and comprehend other ELL speakers while using English.
    3. Participate in conversational exercises with a partner.
    4. Participate in small group discussions in academic situations.
    5. Participate in whole-class discussions and activities.
    6. Create oral presentations appropriate for academic situations.
    7. Write comprehensible notes.
  
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    ELL 83 - Intermediate Reading and Writing

    4 CR
    Students will further develop independent reading comprehension skills for reading in English. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary development, active reading strategies, variable reading rates, independent silent reading and comprehension. Students will learn to internalize both the grammar and vocabulary that they have been studying by using it to produce well-formed sentences and paragraphs. The focus is on strengthening the students’ ability to express themselves in written English. Students must satisfactorily complete their work before advancing to a higher level reading and writing course.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL reading score of 71 (AND) (2) ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 71 (OR) (3) ELL 73 with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Read and comprehend texts.
    2. Write short academic papers.
    3. Apply research and library skills.
    4. Apply MLA citation skills in academic papers and shorter response writings.
    5. Apply and understand academic words and terms.
    6. Expand vocabulary.
  
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    ELL 84 - Intermediate Grammar and Communication

    4 CR
    Students will expand upon their knowledge of English grammar and vocabulary and their ability to understand and use spoken and written English. Special attention is given to the appropriate use of the forms studied.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 71 (OR) (2) ELL 74 with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Develop fluency in writing and speaking.
    2. Increase grammatical accuracy in writing and speaking.
    3. Self-edit for accuracy in writing and speaking.
    4. Develop awareness of the relationship of grammar to meaning.
  
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    ELL 85 - Intermediate Speaking and Listening

    4 CR
    Students will improve their aural and oral communication skills. The three components of the course are a systematic introduction to and practice with the sound system of American English, especially suprasegmentals; extensive listening practice; and introduction to and practice with appropriate conversational skills, such as offering, accepting, and refusing invitations, and asking for and giving opinions.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL listening score of 71 (OR) (2) ELL 75 with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Communicate with and comprehend English speakers.
    2. Participate in small group discussions in academic situations.
    3. Participate in whole-class discussions and activities.
    4. Give oral presentations appropriate for academic situations.
    5. Take comprehensible notes.
  
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    ELL 93 - Advanced Reading and Writing

    4 CR
    Students will focus on strengthening the academic writing skills needed for American college courses. Emphasis will be on developing ideas in paragraphs and essays. Students will engage in a rigorous study of academic vocabulary needed for college-level writing.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL reading score of 86 (AND) (2) ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 86 (OR) (3) ELL 83  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Read and comprehend texts.
    2. Write short academic papers.
    3. Employ research and library skills.
    4. Employ MLA and APA citation skills in academic papers and shorter response writings.
    5. Apply and understand academic words and terms.
  
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    ELL 94 - Advanced Grammar and Communication

    4 CR
    Students will study sophisticated forms of English grammar, including subject/verb inversion, reduced clauses, and complex verb phrases. Special attention is given to the appropriate use of the forms studied. Successful completion of ELL 84  is required for progressing into classes with native speakers.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL language use score of 86 (OR) (2) ELL 84  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Develop fluency in writing and speaking.
    2. Increase grammatical accuracy in writing and speaking.
    3. Self-edit for accuracy in writing and speaking.
    4. Develop awareness of the relationship of grammar to meaning.
  
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    ELL 95 - Advanced Speaking and Listening

    4 CR
    Students will develop the listening, note-taking and speaking skills needed for success in American college classrooms. Instructional activities will include a variety of formal speech acts, such as introducing, announcing and negotiating. In addition to mastering English Phonemes and suprasegmentals, students will focus on the correct pronunciation of high-level vocabulary from the academic word list in the context of formal speaking. Students will develop the listening, note-taking and speaking skills needed for success in American college classrooms. Instructional activities will include a variety of formal speech acts, such as introducing, announcing and negotiating. In addition to mastering English Phonemes and suprasegmentals, students will focus on the correct pronunciation of high-level vocabulary from the academic word list in the context of formal speaking.

    Requisites: (1) ACCUPLACER® ESL listening score of 86 (OR) (2) ELL 85  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Communicate with and comprehend English speakers.
    2. Participate in small group discussions in academic situations.
    3. Participate in whole-class discussions and activities.
    4. Give oral presentations appropriate for academic situations.
    5. Take comprehensible notes.

Engineering Science

  
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    ENGR 256 - Statics

    3 CR
    Forces and moments acting upon structural bodies under static loads. Concepts of vectors, free-body diagrams, shear and moment diagrams, centroids, moments of inertia and friction.

    Requisites: Take PHYS 221  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Natural Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will be able to draw complete free-body diagrams and write appropriate equilibrium equations from the free-body diagram, including the support reactions on a structure.
    2. Students will be able to apply the concepts of equilibrium to various structures.
    3. Students will be able to calculate moments, centers of mass, the moment of inertia, and equivalent loads.
  
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    ENGR 258 - Dynamics

    4 CR
    Kinematics and kinetics of particles, rigid bodies in translation, rotation, and plane motion. Includes impulse-momentum and work-energy methods. Introduction to vibrations. Introduction to space mechanics.

    Requisites: Take ENGR 256  with at least a grade of C.
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Natural Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will be able to draw the free-body diagram for a particle or for a rigid body in motion.
    2. Students will be able to apply Newton’s Laws, the principles of work and energy and impulse and momentum.
    3. Students will be able to apply vector analysis and the appropriate level of mathematics to study the motion of particles.

Engineering Technology

  
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    ENTE 215 - Material Science

    3 CR
    This course is intended to introduce the student to the materials used in engineering/industry and their properties. The types of material studied will include ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics, rubber, ceramics, glass, and cement. In addition, material inspection, testing, and the effects of heat treatment and corrosion will be studied. Laboratory experiences will include the testing and inspection of materials. [48-16-64] Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Quantify different material attributes based on costs, sourcing, processing, and environmental.
    2. Analyze materials based on their physical, chemical, and mechanical properties.
    3. Understand the major characteristics of metals, polymers, ceramics, and composite materials.

First Year Seminar

  
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    FYS 101 - First-Year Seminar

    1 CR
    The First-Year Seminar is designed to introduce and connect students to the KCC community and to assist students in the active development of financial planning for college, as well as, setting academic and personal goals. Students will work with instructors to learn strategies for their transition into college, as well as engage in building the skills needed for college success. Course discussions will include academic preparation, self-awareness, and an understanding of KCC services, resources, and student-related policies, and procedures.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 230, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate the navigation of college resources.
    2. Analyze self-management skills and persistence practices.
    3. Apply strategies for succeeding in a diverse society.

French

  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French

    4 CR
    Introductory course stressing pronunciation, comprehension, basic grammar structures, and French culture and civilization. Individual/small group sessions to practice grammar and pronunciation are used. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Listening competencies will be limited to being able to identify very basic memorized vocabulary. Competencies in reading will be limited to being able to pronounce letters and sounds in very basic French sentences.
    2. Speaking competencies will be limited to being able to restate in the present tense only very basic information, feelings, and ideas about oneself, about other people, and about objects used daily. Students will be able to ask very basic questions in French and give answers both affirmatively and negatively.
    3. Competencies in writing will be limited to being able to write lists and very short French sentences only. Students will not be able to write compositions in paragraph form.
  
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    FREN 102 - Elementary French

    4 CR
    Aimed at developing communicative ability, this course is based on a series of real-life themes, situations, and speech. Vocabulary and grammatical structures are presented within an appropriate thematic or situational context. Emphasis is on vocabulary and syntax. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take FREN 101  with at least a grade of C.
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Listening competencies will be limited to being able to interpret basic spoken information, feelings, and ideas about everyday life in the present tense, future tense, and past tense. Competencies in reading will be limited to summarizing short and simple texts.
    2. Speaking competencies will be limited to being able to present basic information on familiar topics in short phrases and simple sentences supported by memorized language. By the end of that level, students should be able to ask basic French questions and give basic French positive & negative answers using the present, the future and the past tense.
    3. Competencies in writing will be limited to being able to write short messages, lists and small skits on familiar topics related to everyday life, but students will not be able to write compositions in paragraph form.
  
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    FREN 201 - Intermediate French

    4 CR
    Comprehensive oral and written reviews of grammatical structures through varied reading selections, conversations, and presentations. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take FREN 102  with at least a grade of C.
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Listening competencies: students will be able to summarize the main idea in short, simple messages and presentations on familiar topics.
    2. Reading competencies: students will be able to summarize the main idea of short and simple texts when the topic is familiar.
    3. Speaking competencies: students will be able to participate in conversations on a number of familiar topics using simple sentences. They will be able to participate in short social interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering simple questions.
    4. Writing competencies: students will be able to write briefly about most familiar topics and present information using a series of simple sentences.
  
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    FREN 202 - Intermediate French

    4 CR
    Extensive reading to further develop vocabulary and mastery of the language. Advanced prose selections from varied French writers. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take FREN 201  with at least a grade of C.
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Listening competencies: students will be able to summarize the main idea in messages and presentations on a variety of topics related to everyday life, personal interests, and studies. They will be able to understand the main idea in conversations they hear.
    2. Reading competencies: students will be able to summarize the main idea of texts related to everyday life and personal interests of studies.
    3. Speaking competencies: students will be able to participate in conversations on familiar topics in series of connected sentences, participate in short social interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions about themselves and their everyday lives.
    4. Writing competencies: students will be able to write on a wide variety of familiar topics using connected sentences. They will be able to write in the past tense, in the present tense, and in the future tense.

Geography

  
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    GEOG 100 - Physical Geography

    4 CR
    A one-semester lecture and hands-on laboratory course devoted to the origin and continuous evolution of the planet earth. Areas of consideration include spatial distribution, location and time, the structure of the earth, earth-sun relationship, plate tectonics, soils, gradational processes, elements of weather and climate, and the distribution of vegetation and water resources. The influence of living organisms on all of these processes will be considered as part of the earth’s dynamic state of change. [48-16-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Critical Thinking - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Natural Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Create a climograph given the temperature and precipitation data for a region of the Earth.
    2. Identify the effects of volcanic activity on the atmospheric balance of the Earth.
    3. Analyze the controls, distribution, and classification of world climates.
    4. Describe seasonal Earth-Sun relations and explain the resulting physical phenomena on Earth’s surface.
    5. Explain the Theory of Plate Tectonics, provide scientific evidence in its support, and explain its correlation to the creation of landforms.
    6. Analyze and interpret a weather map.
    7. Utilize and interpret a topographic map.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of geographic processes and explain their correlation to the alteration of landforms.

Graphic Design

  
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    GRDE 103 - Introduction to Graphic Design

    3 CR
    This course is an orientation to the graphic design field and a preparation for success in the Graphic Design Program. The course will introduce areas inherent to the field including history, contemporary design, work-related occupations, marketing, typography, printing, web design and animation, and software and hardware. In addition, preliminary training will be provided on Macintosh computers, printers and networks. [24-24-48] Lab Fee

    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of the graphic design process.
    2. Identify the different areas of graphic design.
    3. Demonstrate basic composition and layout skills.
    4. Perform basic skills using industry-standard application programs on graphic design projects.
  
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    GRDE 135 - Digital Illustration and Layout

    3 CR
    This course provides an overview of the functionality and use of technology for creating digital illustrations and page layout design. Through hands-on lectures, demonstrations, and projects the student will learn the fundamental tools and techniques of current industry-standard vector software used in digital design. Emphasis is given to creating professional-looking design work utilizing the computer as a tool. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    General Education Requirement: Effective Communication - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify the advantages and limitations of vector software.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in creating type with type layout tools using vector-based software.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in creating object-oriented graphics with digital illustration tools using vector-based software.
    4. Demonstrate basic composition and layout skills.
  
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    GRDE 145 - Digital Imaging

    3 CR
    This course provides an overview of the functionality and use of technology for creating and editing digital images. Through hands-on lectures, demonstrations, and projects the student will learn the fundamental tools and techniques of current industry-standard raster software used for digital images. Emphasis is given to creating professional-looking art and graphics work utilizing the computer as a tool. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate proficiency in creating and editing images with digital image tools using raster-based software.
    2. Demonstrate basic composition and layout skills.
    3. Demonstrate effective file skills in the production of projects.
    4. Identify and use appropriate design and electronic vocabulary.
  
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    GRDE 157 - HTML/XML

    3 CR
    This course explores the components, terminology, features and uses of HTML/XML. Emphasis is given to creating professional-looking web pages utilizing HTML/XML as the layout vehicle. Through hands-on lectures, demonstrations and projects, the student will learn the essential techniques and functions of the language, while understanding some of the more complex issues that designers face when using HTML/XML. [16-32-48] Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Apply common practices in website development processes using HTML and XML.
    2. Identify and use appropriate Internet, web design and HTML/XML vocabulary and concepts.
    3. Skillfully apply fundamentals of form and function that go into a user-friendly online experience.
  
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    GRDE 204 - Typography and Typesetting

    3 CR
    This course involves the study of typography and typesetting as an integral element of graphic design. The principles of typography will be examined through the topics of history, fonts and their classifications, and type as image and design element. Layout and typesetting projects will involve various types of documents and publishing with the purpose to achieve successful, informative and expressive visual communication. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take GRDE 103  ,GRDE 135  or GRDE 145  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify and use appropriate typography and typesetting vocabulary and concepts.
    2. Apply basic principles of design and layout to typography and typesetting.
    3. Recognize and apply common styles of typesetting.
    4. Compose page layout using type as an image and design element.
  
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    GRDE 206 - Graphic Design 1

    3 CR
    This course involves understanding the various stages of developing layouts in graphic design. A focus on the organization of type and imagery will be emphasized including the basic rules of creativity and brainstorming, applying the principles of design to layout, concept and graphic design project process development, color, grid structure, and beginning application of campaign design. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take GRDE 103 , GRDE 135 , and GRDE 145  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Manipulate and combine core design elements such as type, shape, and image to transmit meaning and values.
    2. Understand and skillfully apply principles and elements of design and layout.
    3. Develop projects through all steps of the creative process from research and concept to finished product.
    4. Understand and apply beginning logo design concepts.
  
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    GRDE 208 - Graphic Design 2

    3 CR
    This course continues the direction established in Graphic Design 1  and further develops the design and marketing abilities of students. It focuses on preparing the student to effectively communicate ideas and information to business and consumer audiences using design. Subjects covered will include target markets, budget and client interaction, logo and identity, branding, advertising and marketing. Students will develop strategies and ideas from concept to completion. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take GRDE 204  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze context, audiences, markets, and cultural history and their applications to design work.
    2. Develop projects through all steps of the creative process from research and concept to finished product as it relates to branding.
    3. Understand and skillfully apply principles and elements of design and layout.
    4. Demonstrate a high degree of professional craftsmanship and presentation (organization, neatness, precision).
  
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    GRDE 210 - Design for the Web

    3 CR
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of web design using relevant design and marketing strategies. Through hands-on exercises, students will design and construct webpages from concept to active, using industry-standard development environments. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take ART 227  or GRDE 145  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Apply common practices in website development processes.
    2. Identify the use of appropriate web design, Internet vocabulary, and concepts.
    3. Skillfully apply principles and elements of design and layout to the web environment.
  
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    GRDE 211 - Design for New Media

    3 CR
    This course takes what is learned in Design for the Web and expands beyond it. Through hands-on assignments the student will create and develop projects focusing on the design for web, multimedia and interactive environments. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take GRDE 210  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate technical familiarity with industry-standard software.
    2. Identify and apply user interface and interaction patterns and strategies.
    3. Identify and use typographic and design principles as they relate to new media.
    4. Skillfully apply planning organization and sequential design methodologies to new media.
  
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    GRDE 261 - Graphic Design Practicum

    3 CR
    This course allows the student to work with the instructor through field-related experiences. The instructor works as the manager with the student on a variety of projects taken from business and industry. The course allows the student to gain experience and understanding of the field in a job-like environment. [16-80-96] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take GRDE 135  and GRDE 145  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the production and printing processes.
    2. Modify design work through communication with clients.
    3. Demonstrate a high degree of professional craftsmanship and presentation (organization, neatness, precision).
    4. Develop skills in meeting critical deadlines.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to form and defend value judgments about graphic design and to communicate art ideas, concepts, and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to the practice.
  
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    GRDE 271 - Graphic Design Internship

    3 CR
    This course provides the opportunity for the student to gain relevant career experience by being placed in a non-classroom environment that exposes them to modern business practices. Typically, local advertising agencies, graphic design firms, and printing houses are utilized to provide valid work experience for the student. Students either will be placed by the instructor or can choose an internship location upon approval from the instructor.

    Additional Information: Program Coordinator approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Modify design work through communication with client.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in communication, presentation, and business skills necessary to engage in professional practice in graphic design.
    3. Develop skills in meeting critical deadlines.
    4. Demonstrate ability to form and defend value judgments about graphic design and to communicate art ideas, concepts, and requirements to professionals and laypersons related to the practice.
  
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    GRDE 296 - Portfolio Review

    3 CR
    This course focuses on students developing their design portfolio. It will provide the student the opportunity to apply the combined understanding gained from earlier courses and projects to more fully realized work for a portfolio of designs that will prepare them for future design endeavors. A final portfolio review will be held at the end of the semester to provide a full evaluation of the student’s portfolio in preparation for entering the job market. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Requisites: Take GRDE 206  and GRDE 210  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Develop, edit, and organize personal portfolio at a professional level of quality.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to form and defend value judgments about graphic design.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in communication, presentation, and business skills necessary to engage in professional practice in graphic design.
    4. Develop skills in meeting critical deadlines.
  
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    GRDE 297 - Graphic Design-Special Topics

    4 CR
    This course allows the student to explore focus areas such as specific software, publications, printed material, and web page development. Since topics change, this course may be repeated for credit toward graduation up to eight credits. [32-32-64] Lab Fee

    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Interpret history, concepts or fundamental characteristics of topic area as it relates to graphic design.
    2. Utilize materials, techniques or design fundamentals for topic areas in the production of graphic design projects.
    3. Skillfully apply principles and elements of design and layout as it applies to the Special Topic and its relation to graphic design.
  
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    GRDE 298 - Independent Study

    3 CR
    An opportunity for the interested student to pursue independently the study of some subject under the direction of a member(s) of the professional staff. Problems are designed and arrangements made to meet the needs of the individual students.

    Additional Information: Department approval required.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Interpret history, concepts or fundamental characteristics of an independent study subject as it relates to graphic design.
    2. Utilize materials, techniques or design fundamentals for an independent study topic area in the production of graphic design projects.
    3. Skillfully apply principles and elements of design and layout as it applies to the independent study subject.

History

  
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    HIST 103 - American Foundations

    3 CR
    A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from the colonial era to 1877.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in American history to 1877.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 104 - Modern America

    3 CR
    A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from 1877 to the present.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in American history since 1877.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 104H - Modern America - Honors

    3 CR
    A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from 1877 to present. Honors courses emphasize individual study, personal, and group projects with additional learning outcomes common to the Honors Program.

    Additional Information: Students may enter the Honors course only as part of the Honors Program or with department approval.


    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in American history since 1877.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.

    Honors Outcomes:

    1. Collaborate in college, local, and global communities.
    2. Demonstrate expertise and research skills in select areas of study.
    3. Develop an interdisciplinary perspective across the liberal arts and sciences.
    4. Demonstrate intellectual independence through verbal and written work.
    5. Demonstrate research skills, including analysis of information and perspectives from diverse sources.
    6. Develop plans and skills to further both academic and professional careers.

  
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    HIST 106 - Religious History

    3 CR
    A comparative study of the historical development, doctrine, and practices of the major varieties of Christianity or of other great world religions. Pertinent social factors and recent events will also be explored. The specific topic to be studied will change from semester to semester, and students may enroll again for up to six credit hours as often as the study topic is changed. With certain topics students must be able to attend religious events or exhibits scheduled in the evening or on weekends.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Students will evaluate primary sources relevant to religion, including, written materials, works of art, artifacts performance, and oral tradition.
    2. Students will explore the major texts, key figures, significant traditions, and important themes in polytheistic and monotheistic belief systems.
    3. Students will investigate the historical and contemporary relevance of religion.
  
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    HIST 151 - Western Civilization: Early Western World

    3 CR
    This course is a survey of the major developments in European Civilization from the ancient Middle East, Greece and Rome, the medieval period, Renaissance, and Reformation to early modern Europe (the mid-1600s). Selected political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, and aesthetic elements that form present-day western civilization will be emphasized. The course will also emphasize the interchange of ideas between Asia, Africa, and the West, as well as an understanding of our cultural history as essential to the study of other cultures.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in European history to 1688.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 151H - Western Civilization: Early Western World - Honors

    3 CR
    This course is a survey of the major developments in European Civilization from the ancient Middle East, Greece and Rome, the medieval period, Renaissance, and Reformation to early modern Europe (the mid-1600s). Selected political, economic, social religious, intellectual, and aesthetic elements that form present-day western civilization will be emphasized. The course will also emphasize the interchange of ideas between Asia, Africa, and the West, as well as an understanding of our cultural history as essential to the study of other cultures. Honors courses emphasize individual study, personal, and group projects with additional learning outcomes common to the Honors Program.

    Additional Information: Students may enter the Honors course only as part of the Honors Program or with department approval.


    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in European history to 1688.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.

    Honors Outcomes:

    1. Collaborate in college, local, and global communities.
    2. Demonstrate expertise and research skills in select areas of study.
    3. Develop an interdisciplinary perspective across the liberal arts and sciences.
    4. Demonstrate intellectual independence through verbal and written work.
    5. Demonstrate research skills, including analysis of information and perspectives from diverse sources.
    6. Develop plans and skills to further both academic and professional careers.

  
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    HIST 152 - Western Civilization: Modern Western World

    3 CR
    This course is a survey of the major developments in European Civilization from the mid-1600s to the present. Selected political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, and aesthetic elements from the scientific revolution to the contemporary world will be considered. The impact of revolution, nationalism, and world war upon recent world events will be emphasized. The course will also include the interchange of ideas between Asia, Africa, and the West.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in European history since 1500.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 152H - Western Civilization: Modern Western World - Honors

    3 CR
    This course is a survey of the major developments in European Civilization from the mid-1600s to the present. Selected political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, and aesthetic elements from the scientific revolution to the contemporary world will be considered. The impact of revolution, nationalism, and world war upon recent world events will be emphasized. The course will also include the interchange of ideas between Asia, Africa, and the West. Honors courses emphasize individual study, personal, and group projects with additional learning outcomes common to the Honors Program.

    Additional Information: Students may enter the Honors course only as part of the Honors Program or with department approval.


    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in European history since 1500.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.

    Honors Outcomes:

    1. Collaborate in college, local, and global communities.
    2. Demonstrate expertise and research skills in select areas of study.
    3. Develop an interdisciplinary perspective across the liberal arts and sciences.
    4. Demonstrate intellectual independence through verbal and written work.
    5. Demonstrate research skills, including analysis of information and perspectives from diverse sources.
    6. Develop plans and skills to further both academic and professional careers.

  
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    HIST 201 - Global History to 1500

    3 CR
    An interdisciplinary study of various world civilizations in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe from 10,000 B.C.E. (Before Common Era) to 1500 C.E. (Common Era). This course will use a comparative approach to study a variety of global themes and patterns over time.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in Global history to 1500.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 202 - Global History from 1500 to Present

    3 CR
    An interdisciplinary study of various world civilizations in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe from 1500 C.E. (Common Era) to the present. This course will use a comparative approach to study a variety of global themes and patterns over time.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in Global history since 1500.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 210 - History of Michigan

    3 CR
    The origin and development of the contemporary political, economic, and social institutions of the State of Michigan. The relation of this history of the state to that of the nation is stressed.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in Michigan history.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 211 - History of England to 1688

    3 CR
    This course will examine English history and its culture from the Roman invasions through the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. Students will study England’s cultural traditions (legal, religious, and philosophical, as well as artistic and literary) within the political, economic, and social context. Emphasis is placed on the origins and development of the institutions most affecting the heritage of the English-speaking world.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in British history to 1688.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 212 - History of England from 1688

    3 CR
    Beginning in 1689, this course continues the analysis of political, social, and cultural trends in England to the present time. Emphasis is placed on the recent period of imperial development, breakdown, and resultant problems. Lectures, readings, and individual research comprise course requirements.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in British history since 1688.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 240 - African American History

    3 CR
    This course will focus on the African American experience since the era of the Civil War. Major emphasis will be placed on the background and development of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. An overview of the contributions of African Americans to American culture will be explored, as well as the sociocultural obstacles faced by this minority group.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions affecting African American society since the Civil War.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 250 - History of Africa

    3 CR
    This course is a study of the historical, geographic, economic, political, and social institutions of the various African countries and territories. The course examines and analyzes factors contributing to the unique conditions of African society, past and present.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in African history.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 260 - History of Middle East and North Africa

    3 CR
    This course is a survey of the Middle East and North Africa from antiquity to the present. Major themes include the origin and evolution of monotheism, the rise and fall of various empires, such as the Persian and Ottoman, and the rise of their successor states, American and European influence, Arab nationalism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the emergence of radical Islamic movements such as Hamas and al Qaeda.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Social Sciences
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in the Middle East and North African history.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.
  
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    HIST 290 - History of the Straits of Mackinac

    3 CR
    This course will explore the history of the Straits of Mackinac from the mid-18th century through the Antebellum Era. Specific emphasis will be placed on the application of historical knowledge through travel to the region.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Analyze historical resources and primary materials.
    2. Examine historical eras using resources and primary materials.
    3. Identify cultural, social, political, and economic institutions in the history of the Straits.
    4. Assess these institutions, trends, and/or themes as catalysts of historical change.

Humanities

  
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    HUMA 151 - Encounter with the Arts

    3 CR
    This course is designed to introduce students to the performing arts. Students must be able to attend specific exhibits and performances in art, theatre, music, dance, and cinema in the evening and on weekends. Classroom activities will be based on the lecture/discussion format. Lab Fee

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - General Education Core
    Michigan Transfer Agreement Requirement: Humanities and Fine Arts
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of various terminology and concepts inherent in each of the forms through quizzes and a compressive final exam.
    2. Attend and/or engage in six artistic experiences throughout the semester; these will include a live concert, a theatrical performance, a visit to an art gallery, a film, a dance concert/rehearsal, and time either playing or observing the playing of a video game. Extra credit will be available for those who seek out and analyze street art. All experiences will be arranged to fit within each student’s personal availability and budgetary constraints.
    3. Compose six personal responses to the events they attended aimed at reinforcing terminology and subjective conclusions of each experience.
    4. Engage in class discussions covering key artistic elements of empathy, context, appropriation and subjectivity - and their importance on living healthy and full civic, professional and personal lives outside of the arts.

Human Services

  
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    HUSE 101 - Introduction to Human Services

    3 CR
    This course introduces the student to the basic conceptual knowledge of social organizations and the role of the human service worker. Included are the beginning skills for social service practice and discussion of the ethical commitments and legal considerations underlying professional helping careers.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    General Education Requirement: Personal and Cultural Engagement - Applied Core
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify the purposes of human services.
    2. Distinguish the characteristics of various human service professionals.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of social problems in human services.
    4. Explain the importance of adhering to the Human Services Professional Code of Ethics.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of working within the system.
  
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    HUSE 183 - Practicum in Human Services

    3 CR
    Supervised practicum with the adolescent and adult populations. This course is designed to provide experience in the integration and application of the knowledge and skills of the human service worker. The student will be supervised in a reality-based work environment.

    Additional Information: Recommend prior to or concurrent: Take HUSE 220 .

    Students must be able to meet site requirements, which may include additional criminal background checks, a health physical, and a TB check.


    Requisites: Take HUSE 101  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes of an effective human service worker.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethics and behavior as identified in the Ethical Standards of Human Service Workers.
    3. Assess and develop plans to effectively meet the needs of others.
    4. Communicate effectively and professionally, both orally and in writing.

  
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    HUSE 184 - Practicum in Human Services

    3 CR
    Supervised practicum with preschool and elementary-age children. This course is designed to provide experience in the integration and application of the knowledge and skills of the human service worker. The student will be supervised in a reality-based work environment.

    Additional Information: Recommend prior to or concurrent: Take HUSE 220 .

    Students must be able to meet site requirements, which may include additional criminal background checks, a health physical, and a TB check.


    Requisites: Take HUSE 101  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes of an effective human service worker.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethics and behavior as identified in the Ethical Standards of Human Service Workers.
    3. Assess and develop plans to effectively meet the needs of others.
    4. Communicate effectively and professionally, both orally and in writing.

  
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    HUSE 185 - Human Service Internship

    3 CR
    A course designed to give on-the-job field experiences commensurate with the student’s career objectives. Required are 175 hours of on-the-job experience plus attendance at a two-hour scheduled seminar every other week.

    Additional Information: Recommend prior to or concurrent: Take HUSE 220 .

    Students must be able to meet site requirements, which may include additional criminal background checks, a health physical, and a TB check.


    Requisites: Take HUSE 101  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Integrate knowledge and skills acquired from various Human Service courses.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethics and behavior as identified in the Ethical Standards of Human Service Workers.
    3. Assess and effectively use tools for individual and/or group intervention.
    4. Construct documentation of appropriate individual or group information as required by a specific work site.

  
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    HUSE 186 - Human Service Internship

    3 CR
    A continuation of HUSE 185 , although a different placement setting is generally selected.

    Additional Information: Students must be able to meet site requirements, which may include additional criminal background checks, a health physical, and a TB check.
    Requisites: Take HUSE 185  with at least a grade of C.
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Integrate knowledge and skills acquired from various Human Service courses.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethics and behavior as identified in the Ethical Standards of Human Service Workers.
    3. Assess and effectively use tools for individual and/or group intervention.
    4. Construct documentation of appropriate individual or group information as required by a specific worksite.
  
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    HUSE 200 - Psychosocial Approach to Aging

    3 CR
    This course explores the social, psychological, economic, and physical aspects of aging. There is an emphasis on the concerns and social options of the aged in contemporary American society.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Differentiate the development of the field gerontology in contrast to other human service fields.
    2. Distinguish the special characteristics of the aging society.
    3. Identify theories of aging through evidence-based arguments.
    4. Analyze research that relates to the aging process.
  
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    HUSE 203 - Introduction to Substance Abuse

    3 CR
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the history of drug use and abuse that explores the theoretical and practical issues and survey treatment modalities and current prevention strategies.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® reading score of 244, or at least a grade of C in TSRE 55 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of alcohol and drug use in the United States.
    2. Explain the development of drug laws.
    3. Distinguish the effects of drugs on the nervous system.
    4. Identify characteristics of drug users.        
    5. Identify and describe alcohol and drug treatment methods.
  
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    HUSE 204 - An Introduction to Report Writing Techniques for the Human Service Worker

    3 CR
    This course provides an opportunity for students to learn record keeping and report writing techniques needed by human service workers. Because report writing requires critical professional judgment at all levels, emphasis will be placed on expanding the students’ general information in the human service field.

    Requisites: Next Gen ACCUPLACER® writing score of at 237, or at least a grade of C in TSEN 95 , or ENGL 151 .
    Course Learning Outcomes:
    1. Differentiate various types of professional human service reports.
    2. Analyze appropriate content to be included in specific reports.
    3. Discuss the principles of good records.
    4. Differentiate between well written and poorly written reports.
 

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